Eunice Parsons Papers

Eunice Parsons was born in 1916 in Loma, Colorado but spent most of her young life in Chicago. When she was a young girl, she attended children’s classes at the University of Chicago where she learned an appreciation for art, as well as the skills that would allow her to pursue a career in the field later in life. After graduating high school, Parsons attended a few art classes from the University of Chicago. Soon after, Parsons married and moved to Portland along with her new husband. She spent the next two decades as a working mother. In the 1940s she began taking classes at the Portland Museum Art School. Shortly after, in 1957, she took a trip to New York to acquaint and immerse herself in the culture of art. Parsons took a sketchbook where she made exhaustive notes and depicted many landscapes. This notebook showcases her earliest inclinations in playing with color, line, and shading, all developing into a unique and distinctive style. After returning from New York, Parsons continued her career as an artist and eventually began teaching at the Portland Museum Art School. While teaching, she became notorious as a blunt but brilliant instructor and would lead numerous student trips to Europe and the birthplaces of western art. In 2006 Parsons, along with others, was instrumental in opening the 12×16 Gallery in Portland. In 2017 she continues to be an influential and prolific artist at the age of 100.

The Eunice Parsons papers encompass not only Eunice Parsons’ long and influential career as a Portland artist, but also the inner workings of the Portland art community from the early 1950s through to the present day. It contains Parsons’ manuscripts from her endeavors as an author, fliers from a variety of Portland artists, photographs and slides from her teaching career, samples of her art and sketchbooks, professional papers, and a great wealth of correspondence in the form of Christmas cards from many of the most famous Portland artists.

For additional information about this collection, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/5012

Also, view the online exhibit of a few selected sketch books: exhibit by the same intern who processed her collection:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/archives/omeka/exhibits/show/matriarchofmodernism/introduction

Note: The Eunice Parsons papers were processed and the exhibition created by McKelvey Mandigo-Stoba, Willamette University ’17. A special thank you to Sybil Westenhouse for investing in experiential learning through the Sybil Westenhouse Archives Excellence Fund.


Betty LaDuke Conversation

You’re invited! Join us for a panel discussion exploring the roles art and activism play in raising awareness, creating social change, and advocating for justice.

Talk Title:  Social Justice Through Art, Advocacy, and Activism: A Conversation with Artist Betty LaDuke and Guests

Topics discussed will include human rights, sustainability, and immigration within a local, national and international context, with a focus on current events such as Standing Rock and DACA. Internationally recognized artist and activist Betty LaDuke will present an artist’s talk followed by a panel discussion. Joining LaDuke for the discussion is Native hip hop artist Scott Kalama (Warm Springs) aka Blue Flamez, and Willamette University student and President of Willamette’s Native and Indigenous Student Union Alexus Uentillie (Diné) ’19.  Also offered in conjunction with the panel discussion are the exhibits on display in Goudy Commons, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, Rogers Music Hall, and third floor of the University Center (Putnam).

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Location: Ford Hall – Theatre

Audience: Free and open to the public. General Seating.

Sponsors:  Willamette University Green Grant Fund, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, and University Archives and Special Collections.

Questions: Contact Mary McRobinson (mmcrobin@willamette.edu, 503-370-6764) and Jonathan Bucci (jbucci@willamette.edu, 503-370-6861).

 


1941 Pearl Harbor Willamette Football Team

Guide to the Pearl Harbor Game collection

We’re featuring the archival guide of the 1941 Pearl Harbor Game Collection in which the Willamette Football Team found themselves involved in the infamous Pearl Harbor attack.

Link to the collection: http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4269

Here is an ESPN video interview of some of those involved:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrCUBnKZli0&feature=youtu.be

1941-pearl-harbor-football-team

The Pearl Harbor Game collection contains .5 linear feet of news articles, letters and transcriptions of interviews with participants, photographs and memorabilia connected with Willamette University’s 1941 football team and its experience in Hawaii in the days following December 7, 1941.

Collection Number:     WUA009

From the archival path finder:  “On board, as passengers, were the football squads of Willamette University and San Jose College, in Honolulu for games with the University of Hawaii at the time of the Japanese attack. These men, under their respective coaches, volunteered in case of emergency to rescue and place in the ship’s boats the seriously wounded men. They drilled at their assignments. In addition, they volunteered to and did feed such wounded as were unable to help themselves. They promoted good morale among the patients in many ways. I consider the services rendered by these young men to be very commendable.”

(Excerpt from a letter written by Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy, to Willamette University president Carl Knopf commending the athletes’ contributions. Knox is quoting from a report filed by a senior naval officer aboard the Merchant vessel used to evacuate those injured in the bombing of Pearl Harbor.)

Willamette University’s 1941 football team accumulated an 8-2 record, captured the Northwest Conference title, and included four future Willamette University Athletic Hall of Fame selections: Ted Ogdahl, Marvin Goodman, Dick Weisgerber (assistant coach), and Roy “Spec” Keene (coach). However, the football team is best remembered for their contributions immediately following the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941.

At the end of the 1941 season, Willamette University and San Jose State were invited to Honolulu, Hawaii, to play in a series of games called the Shrine Bowl. The team was accompanied by a number of supporters, including Bearcat enthusiasts Oregon State Senator Douglas McKay and his daughter, Shirley. On December 6, Willamette lost the first game of the Shrine Bowl to the University of Hawaii, 20-6. The following day, as the entire Willamette contingent was preparing to tour the island of Oahu, Pearl Harbor was bombed. Willamette head coach, Spec Keene, volunteered the men, players and supporters alike, to guard the perimeter of the Punahou School in Honolulu for ten days. The women were volunteered as nurses’ aides at a Navy hospital. Unable to fly home, the team remained in Hawaii until December 19, at which time they returned to the mainland aboard the ocean liner SS President Coolidge. While on board, the team bunked in steerage and, in exchange for passage, were assigned as hospital aides attending wounded men until the ship reached San Francisco on Christmas day.

On September 23, 1997, the football team was inducted into the Willamette University Athletic Hall of Fame. Also inducted that year were Wayne and Shirley (McKay) Hadley, longtime supporters of Willamette athletics who were with the football squad in Hawaii.