The Joy of Art

Paint tubes and paint brushes with paint on them

There is a lot going on in the world right now and many of us are feeling anxious or stressed. Finding methods to help us cope with the uncertainties in our lives is important; one valuable resource to remember is art. Whether you enjoy making art or you love looking at art, art can make a difference. Art has a way of lifting us up, providing much needed distraction, offering moments of joy, inspiring us, and helping us through times of crisis. There is increasing evidence that “art enhances brain function and well-being,” which seems like a positive outcome for all. August is a great time to stop and reflect on the wonder of art in our lives because it is American Artist Appreciation Month! Lots of museums from around the globe are offering virtual tours of their collections that you can enjoy from the comfort of home. Willamette’s very own Hallie Ford Museum offers a great variety of art from all over the world but with a particular emphasis on Northwest art and the Hatfield Library has its own special tie to American artists with the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive. In celebration of American artists, check out the diverse selection of print and e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 


The Right of Peaceful Protest

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” The Boston Tea Party, Civil Rights protests, Women’s Right to Vote marches, Black Lives Matter protests, Iraq War protests, Vietnam War protests, Occupy protests, LGBTQ rights marches, Dakota Access Pipeline protests, March for Our Lives, March for Science—these are just some of the many examples of people exercising their first amendment rights through protest.  For generations, people have been using protests as a way to make their voices heard, call attention to an issue, influence government policy, and change the world.  Millions of people have protested and marched in an effort to fight against injustices and enact social change.  In the thick of these protests, it is sometimes hard to see what they accomplish but in the long term, protests have often succeeded in bringing about important change and even altering the course of history.  In celebration of our right to assembly, check out the diverse selection of protest-related e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 

Let us remember, we are all part of one American family.  We are united in common values, and that includes belief in equality under the law, basic respect for public order, and the right of peaceful protest. – Barack Obama


New Chairs

Notice anything different about the library?  Over the summer we replaced many of our old wooden chairs with a style of chair that we already have.  If you prefer the old wooden chairs, rest assured that we still several scattered throughout the library.  Interestingly, these wooden chairs came from the original library which was located in Smullin Hall.  The new chairs are able to tip back more easily and safely.

 


New Interface to the Library Catalog

This summer we will be transitioning to a new user interface for the library catalog. We will be transitioning to this new interface in late July 2017.

Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier. As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to use this form to send us your comments.


Thank you to the Circulation Desk Student Employees

At the Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk student employees are integral to daily operations. Student employees open and close the library, check items in and out, reshelve library materials, ensure items are in correct order, perform building walkthroughs, troubleshoot a variety of technology issues including printer problems, and most importantly, assist any person in the library who needs help. They have answered their fair share of unusual questions and spearheaded or assisted with many different library-related projects. We want to say thank you to all our student employees for their dedication and hard work during the last academic year.

And we would like to say a special thanks and goodbye to our ten graduating seniors:

Maya Jaramillo
Kaitlen McPherson
Rachel Carstensen
Kelly Jones
Isabel Seiden
Sidney Gallardo
Alexander Tripp
Bridget Wulfing
Hiromi Homma
Susana Hernandez

We are particularly grateful to Maya and Kaitlen, who have been working at the Circulation Desk since the beginning of their first year. They have worked hundreds of hours and helped countless people in the library…thanks so much for everything!

Maya Jaramillo

Kaitlen McPherson