John Oberdorf ArcheoSpaces Exhibit

ArcheoSpaces Exhibit

Works by John Oberdorf

The exhibition ArcheoSpaces — Organized at the Hatfield Library in collaboration with the Salem Art Association at the Bush Barn Art Center — displays a series of drawings, sketches and studies as well as an oil painting created by Salem-based artist, John Oberdorf, in the last five decades.

A graduate of Oregon State University with a degree in Art and a minor in Anthropology, John Oberdorf began his career by making illustrations — in a style that echoed closely the visual vocabulary of Frank Frazetta — for publishers, such as Ace Books, and other magazines specialized in sci-fi stories in 1970s. His imagination, however, was not fulfilled by those enterprises, given the restrictive nature of this typology of visual narratives, in which images are subordinated to the particular story the artist was working on.

Soon enough, John Oberdorf noticed that his capacity of elaborating “Worlds of the possible” — to quote the artist’s own words — reached a point of creative saturation. From that moment on, his career will take a decisive turn and more toward the elaboration of autonomous iconographies, exploring the ambiguity of natural shapes and the mystery of cultural traces in order to stimulate the viewer’s curiosity. In these conceived images, elements such as rocks and helmets symbolically evoke the ceaseless, unpredictable dialogue between Nature and History, Time, Loss and Memory.

Curator: Ricardo De Mambro Santos (Chair, Department of Art History)

Assistant Curator: Jordan DeGelia (Art History major, 2020)

Additional details at: https://willamette.edu/cla/arth/oberdorf-archeospaces/index.html

This exhibit has been partly sponsored by the Verda Karen McCracken Young Art Exhibition Funds of the Department of Art History at Willamette University. Select photos below are of the exhibit at the Hatfield Library.

 


Tree of Giving Results

Thank you all for your donations to this year’s Tree of Giving!  This year we collected 205 books, many of which were brand new.  We also received 21 gloves (plus 1 hat), 1 school bag, 3 pairs of socks.  Thank you everyone for your kind donations!


Women’s Suffrage

Image of Iron Jawed Angels promotional poster

Image source from Wikipedia

By Stephanie Milne-Lane,
Processing Archivist and Records Manager

The ushering in of a new year brings with it thoughts of what the future might bring. But 2020 is unique in that it likewise offers an opportunity to reflect and commemorate. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment, which guaranteed and protected a woman’s constitutional right to vote. While many western states, including Washington (1910) and Oregon (1912), had secured voting rights for white women (at this time in Oregon, Native women and first generation Asian female immigrants were not naturalized citizens and therefore could not vote), it would take several more years and a concerted effort for a national equal suffrage amendment to come to fruition. 

Coalition building and unrelenting hard work eventually led to the United States Congress passing the 19th Amendment on June 4, 1919. However, in order to place the amendment into the Constitution 36 state legislatures had to ratify the amendment. On August 26, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment thereby securing equal voting rights for eligible women. Despite the 19th amendment maintaining “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,” barriers stood between women of color and the ballot box. Voter discrimination at the federal and state level prevented Native, Asian, and African American women from voting in elections for decades. It wouldn’t be until the passage of The Voting Rights Act of 1965 — some 45 years after the ratification of the 19th Amendment — that states were forbidden from imposing discriminatory polling laws. With this in mind, as we recognize the importance of the 19th amendment throughout 2020, it is equally important that we understand its limitations. 

Image courtesy of Willamette University’s Archives, Suffrage Era Scrapbook

Opportunities abound to immerse yourself in the suffrage centennial year. There are a plethora of state and local exhibits you can explore online or in person. In Salem, the Oregon State Archives has the Woman Suffrage Centennial Web Exhibit where you can explore memorabilia and documents that relate to the woman suffrage movement in Oregon. The Hatfield Library also has resources relating to the suffrage movement, including the HBO movie Iron Jawed Angels as well as numerous print resources. Additionally, Willamette’s Archives & Special Collections is home to a Suffrage Era Scrapbook that has been digitized. 

Whether you choose to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with an exhibit, movie, or book, we encourage you to remember the women leaders who lobbied, marched, and protested for the right — before and after 1920 — to enter the voting booth. 

 

Bibliography: 

Aljazeera. n.d. “Who got the right to vote when? A history of voting rights in America.” Accessed on January 8, 2020. https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2016/us-elections-2016-who-can-vote/index.html

Graham, Sara Hunter. 1996. Woman Suffrage and the New Democracy. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Series: Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789 – 2013, Record Group 11: General Records of the United States Government, 1778 – 2006, U.S. National Archives. Accessed January 8, 2020. https://catalog.archives.gov/id/596314 

Oregon Secretary of State.n.d. “Origins of the Woman Suffrage Movement in Oregon.” Accessed January 6, 2020. https://sos.oregon.gov/blue-book/Pages/explore/exhibits/woman-intro.aspx

Sneider, Allison L. 2006. Suffragists in an Imperial Age: U.S. Expansion and the Woman Question, 1870-1929. New York: Oxford University Press.

The Oregon Encyclopedia. 2019. “Woman Suffrage in Oregon (essay).” Last updated July 10, 2019. Accessed January 6, 2020. https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/woman_suffrage_in_oregon/#.XhTWUxdKii4.

Wheeler, Marjorie Spruill. 1995. “A Short History of the Woman Suffrage Movement in America.” In One Woman, One Vote, edited by Marjorie Pruill Wheeler, 9-20. Troutdale, Oregon: NewSage Press. 

 


Tree of Giving Book Drive

Our 15th annual Tree of Giving will take place Nov 18th through Dec 20th.  We’re asking for you help to change the lives of children by donating new or slightly used children’s books for Washington Elementary School. Clothing donations such as hats, gloves and scarves are also welcome.

Books can literally change the life of child.  They help develop literacy skills, inspire imagination and creativity, increase critical thinking skills, bridge language gaps for bilingual students, and so much more!  These are just a few of the books on the school library wish list:

 

– Disney books in Spanish (e.g. Disney Collection of StoriesAladdinLion KingToy Story)

– Anything with unicorns (e.g. Keepers of the Lost Cities)

– Puppies and kitten books (in Spanish)

– Where’s Waldo (or other search & find books)

– Weird But True

– Lego books (themed & how-to-build)

– National Geographic Fact Books and Almanacs

– STEAM Books (ScienceTechnologyEngineeringArchitectureMathematics)

– Language Books (FrenchRussianSign Language, etc.)

– Picture Books in Russian and Spanish

 

For additional info, visit:  https://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving.

Please drop donations off at the Hatfield and Law Libraries, Willamette Store, and Bistro.  Questions and comments can be directed to John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu).  Thank you for your support!

 

Tree of Giving book drive poster


Hatfield Halloween Hunt 2019

Congratulations to Max Turetsky & Emmy Kuniy, winners of the $15 Bistro gift cards.  Their names were drawn from those who found the five clue words throughout our library and website to solve the Hatfield Halloween Hunt riddle (below).

Thank you everyone for participating this year!

 

 

Five clues have been hidden throughout the library and its website for the Halloween Hunt which runs October 28th to the 31st.  Complete a specific task before discovering a hidden word. Collect all five words and then arrange them to solve the riddle below.  Drop off this completed form at the circulation desk by midnight on October 31st for a small prize and a chance to win a $15 Bistro gift card!  Blitz with an umbrella

Clue #1: Blitz loves books about folktales.  Find these books in the 2nd floor stacks.

Clue #2: Blitz has an online Library Guide (LibGuide) for his College Colloquium course called “Blitz’s College Colloquium.”  Find it.

Clue #3: Blitz’s Prof. Meadowlark placed the book “Songs of the Bearcat” on reserve.  Find it.

Clue #4: Blitz found a historical photo of ghosts! Find it in the Archives (2nd floor).

Clue #5: Blitz wrote the biology thesis “Binturong of Willamette.” It is online in the Academic Commons. Find it.

The riddle: Why did Blitz miss the Haunted Halls?  
(Oct 31th at 4-7pm in Montag.  https://events.willamette.edu/event/haunted-halls)

Blitz was  ____________    ____________   ____________    ____________    ____________

Your name & email:  ________________________     ___________________________

For questions or comments, contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu


Norma Paulus Memorial

There will be a memorial for Norma Paulus Saturday (4/27) here at Willamette University in Smith Auditorium at 2:00 p.m. with reception to follow in the Cat Cavern.  The event is open to the public. 
 
Here are two nice articles on Norma Paulus and her connection to Willamette: 
 
The Hatfield Archives does have Norma Paulus’ papers.  They are available to be viewed by appointment Monday-Friday 9 am – 12 pm and 1 pm – 4 pm.  There is a digital finding aid and some of the scrapbooks can be viewed online (or from the finding aid) as well.
 
Questions can be directed to archives@willamette.edu.

Guest Lecture, Professor Dana Frank

On Tuesday evening, April 9, at 7:00pm Professor Dana Frank from the University of California at Santa Cruz will discuss the crisis in Honduras that is fueling immigration to the U.S.  She will be speaking in the Hatfield Room. This event is sponsored by International Studies, Latin American Studies, and History.  We hope to see you there.

Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?  Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup.

Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manual Zelaya.  In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the U.S. Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, U.S. policy in support of the regime, and the Congressional challenges to that policy.  Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the U.S., and the destructive impact of U.S. policy.

Dana Frank is the Professor of History Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Her books include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and the Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. Policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino U.S.A, regularly on Democracy Now!, and on other outlets.  Professor Frank has testified about Honduras before the U.S. House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

 

(Content originally from campus email annoucement.)


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Justin Taylor

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2019 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by fiction writer Justin Taylor, plus a celebration of the winners of this year’s Frank H. Newell Creative Writing Prizes. The event will take place on Thursday, April 4, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store. Justin Taylor Image

Justin Taylor is the author of two story collections, Flings and Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever, as well as a novel, The Gospel of Anarchy. His newest book, Riding with the Ghost, will be published in 2020. His stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in some of the most prestigious venues in the nation, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Sewanee Review, and n+1. Justin is currently the 2018-19 Mark & Melody Teppola Distinguished Visiting Professor at Willamette, teaching courses in creative writing and English literature, and he serves as the fiction editor of the Literary Review.

Here’s how Publisher’s Weekly describes Justin’s book Flings: “Contemporary, intelligent, and occasionally laugh-out-loud funny. These stories, by turns witty and piercing, together form an uncommon portrait of the human heart.”

Read an interview with Justin here: https://fictionwritersreview.com/interview/guided-by-voices-an-interview-with-justin-taylor/

Prior to Justin’s reading, we will celebrate the winners of this year’s Frank H. Newell Creative Writing Prizes, for which Justin served as a judge. The winners will receive their prizes and read brief excerpts from their winning stories:

First place: Claire Alongi, for “A Selective Investigation of the Causes and Effects of Keraunographic Markings Upon a Teenage Subject (Female)”

Second place: Kevin Alexander, for “The Field Study”

Third place: Emily Korn, for “A Word for Change”

About Frank H. Newell:

Mr. Newell graduated from Willamette University in 1949, and subsequently enjoyed a 58-year run in the newspaper and broadcast business. He got his start at Salem’s Capital Journal, where he began in the advertising department. Over the years, he worked his way up through the ranks, and ultimately served as publisher of several news outlets across the nation over his long and successful career. Mr. Newell did not slow down in retirement, however, and at 93, saw his first novel published. He has long had a love for fiction writing, with a particular emphasis on short stories, and wants to foster this interest in future generations of Willamette University students.


Poetry and Social Justice

Please join us on Thursday, March 14th, at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for “Poetry and Social Justice: a reading and conversation with Sarah Browning”.

Presenter: Sarah Browning Sarah Browning Image

Can poetry stop war? Can poets change the world? How do we create inclusive spaces? How do we organize our communities to reclaim our power?

Join us for a reading and conversation with poet, anti-war activist, and community organizing extraordinaire Sarah Browning.

Sarah Browning is the author of Killing Summer (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017) and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden (The Word Works, 2007). She is co-founder and for 10 years was Executive Director of Split This Rock: Poems of Provocation & Witness. She is an Associate Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies and recipient of fellowships from the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities, Mesa Refuge, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, among others. She has been guest editor or co-edited special issues of Beltway Poetry Quarterly, The Delaware Poetry Review, and three issues of POETRY magazine. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact salmutawa@willamette.edu.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: The Art of Editing

Please join us for the second in this spring’s Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University. The Art of Editing Thursday, March 7, 2019, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room. Editing a Paper

Legendary editor and Salem native Gary Fisketjon will discuss his career in editing and book publishing. Fisketjon, who created the Vintage Contemporaries series for Random House, has published some of contemporary literature’s best-known writers, from Raymond Carver and Richard Ford to Donna Tartt and Haruki Murakami. He is currently editor-at-large for Alfred A. Knopf.

The following events are free and open to the public.
Contact Information:
Name: Scott Nadelson
Phone: 503-370-6290