Charles E Larson Chemawa Indian School Collection

Max Turetsky, the Sybil Westenhouse Intern for Spring 2019, was engaged this past semester with the work of digitizing and creating metadata for the Charles E. Larsen collection. See brief description below along with link to the digital collection and link to the finding aid.

The Larsen collection, measuring 2 linear feet, is our most used manuscript collection. Larsen’s granddaughter, Mary Ann Youngblood, donated the collection and has been supportive of getting the collection digitized. We’re thrilled to be able to make these important materials available to the public and want to acknowledge Max’s wonderful work on this project. Thank you, Max!

Charles E Larsen Chemawa Indian School Digital Collection
Charles E Larsen Chemawa Indian School collection (finding aid)

Brief collection description:

The Charles E. Larsen Chemawa Indian School collection is a compilation of Chemawa Indian School and Northwest Native American history dating from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. Materials in this collection give a look at student and employee life on the Chemawa campus. This collection includes newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, handbooks, graduation lists, and historical monographs written by Larsen.

There are two scrapbooks that will be digitized this fall and that will complete the collection. 

Please contact Sara Amato (samato@willamette.edu) or Mary McRobinson (mmcrobin@willamette.edu) if you have any questions. This is an amazing collection!


Norma Paulus Memorial

There will be a memorial for Norma Paulus Saturday (4/27) here at Willamette University in Smith Auditorium at 2:00 p.m. with reception to follow in the Cat Cavern.  The event is open to the public. 
 
Here are two nice articles on Norma Paulus and her connection to Willamette: 
 
The Hatfield Archives does have Norma Paulus’ papers.  They are available to be viewed by appointment Monday-Friday 9 am – 12 pm and 1 pm – 4 pm.  There is a digital finding aid and some of the scrapbooks can be viewed online (or from the finding aid) as well.
 
Questions can be directed to archives@willamette.edu.

Guest Lecture, Professor Dana Frank

On Tuesday evening, April 9, at 7:00pm Professor Dana Frank from the University of California at Santa Cruz will discuss the crisis in Honduras that is fueling immigration to the U.S.  She will be speaking in the Hatfield Room. This event is sponsored by International Studies, Latin American Studies, and History.  We hope to see you there.

Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?  Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup.

Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manual Zelaya.  In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the U.S. Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, U.S. policy in support of the regime, and the Congressional challenges to that policy.  Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the U.S., and the destructive impact of U.S. policy.

Dana Frank is the Professor of History Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Her books include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and the Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. Policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino U.S.A, regularly on Democracy Now!, and on other outlets.  Professor Frank has testified about Honduras before the U.S. House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

 

(Content originally from campus email annoucement.)


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Justin Taylor

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2019 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by fiction writer Justin Taylor, plus a celebration of the winners of this year’s Frank H. Newell Creative Writing Prizes. The event will take place on Thursday, April 4, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store. Justin Taylor Image

Justin Taylor is the author of two story collections, Flings and Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever, as well as a novel, The Gospel of Anarchy. His newest book, Riding with the Ghost, will be published in 2020. His stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in some of the most prestigious venues in the nation, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Sewanee Review, and n+1. Justin is currently the 2018-19 Mark & Melody Teppola Distinguished Visiting Professor at Willamette, teaching courses in creative writing and English literature, and he serves as the fiction editor of the Literary Review.

Here’s how Publisher’s Weekly describes Justin’s book Flings: “Contemporary, intelligent, and occasionally laugh-out-loud funny. These stories, by turns witty and piercing, together form an uncommon portrait of the human heart.”

Read an interview with Justin here: https://fictionwritersreview.com/interview/guided-by-voices-an-interview-with-justin-taylor/

Prior to Justin’s reading, we will celebrate the winners of this year’s Frank H. Newell Creative Writing Prizes, for which Justin served as a judge. The winners will receive their prizes and read brief excerpts from their winning stories:

First place: Claire Alongi, for “A Selective Investigation of the Causes and Effects of Keraunographic Markings Upon a Teenage Subject (Female)”

Second place: Kevin Alexander, for “The Field Study”

Third place: Emily Korn, for “A Word for Change”

About Frank H. Newell:

Mr. Newell graduated from Willamette University in 1949, and subsequently enjoyed a 58-year run in the newspaper and broadcast business. He got his start at Salem’s Capital Journal, where he began in the advertising department. Over the years, he worked his way up through the ranks, and ultimately served as publisher of several news outlets across the nation over his long and successful career. Mr. Newell did not slow down in retirement, however, and at 93, saw his first novel published. He has long had a love for fiction writing, with a particular emphasis on short stories, and wants to foster this interest in future generations of Willamette University students.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: The Art of Editing

Please join us for the second in this spring’s Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University. The Art of Editing Thursday, March 7, 2019, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room. Editing a Paper

Legendary editor and Salem native Gary Fisketjon will discuss his career in editing and book publishing. Fisketjon, who created the Vintage Contemporaries series for Random House, has published some of contemporary literature’s best-known writers, from Raymond Carver and Richard Ford to Donna Tartt and Haruki Murakami. He is currently editor-at-large for Alfred A. Knopf.

The following events are free and open to the public.
Contact Information:
Name: Scott Nadelson
Phone: 503-370-6290


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Lena Khalaf Tuffaha & Gabriel Tallent 

Please join us for the first in this spring’s Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University. New Voices / Alumni Showcase, an evening with Lena Khalaf Tuffaha & Gabriel Tallent on Wednesday, February 6, 2019, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Two of our own return to campus to read from their highly acclaimed first books. Palestinian-American poet Lena Khalaf Tuffaha, who studied at Willamette in the mid-1990s, recently won the Washington Book Award for her poetry volume Water and Salt. Gabriel Tallent, a 2010 graduate, published his first novel, My Absolute Darling, to widespread acclaim, receiving praise in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and National Public Radio. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store. I hope to see you there.

Contact Information:
Name: Scott Nadelson
Phone: 503-370-6290


Newspaper Resources at Willamette

Some common questions that librarians receive at the reference desk revolve around newspapers.  Does the library have this newspaper?  How far back does your subscription go?  How do you use the microfilm machine to read old newspapers?

Before the Internet, most libraries subscribed to newspapers that were mailed to their campuses through the U.S. Postal Service.  Depending on where the newspapers were printed, it could take several days to receive the most recent edition.  And if you were lucky, the paper arrived undamaged!

Newspapers take up a lot of precious shelf space, especially when they are published daily.  To alleviate the space required for old newspapers, they were “photographed” onto microfilm or microform.  Even though the first uses of microfilm occurred as early as 1859, this technology wasn’t embraced by libraries until the 1960 and 1970s.*  However, this technology is cumbersome to use and not a big favorite among library users.  The Hatfield Library no longer receives newspapers on microfilm, but we still have a large collection of older microfilm titles.

Nowadays we access most of our newspapers digitally through the Internet, where they are much more accessible and not confined by physical space limitations.  Of course, digital newspapers require Internet access, electrical power, and often charge expensive access rates.  Technology has allowed us to scan old texts for recognizable words; we can search these words digitally and often bring up that exact instance used within a newspaper.  It certainly beats sifting through stacks of print newspapers or scrolling through rolls of microfilm!

The library continues to receive a number of important regional newspapers in print as well as a selection of national newspapers. Many of these titles are also available digitally; library users are able to access an incredibly wide range of newspapers online through our list of newspaper databases.  If you have a specific newspaper in mind, try looking it up in the Newsbank A-Z list of over 6,500 news sources.  Frequent questions we receive for specific newspapers include the Oregonian, Statesman Journal, Register Guard, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.

If you’re looking for general news, a great place to start is Access World News. This resource pulls from over 5,900 U.S. news sources and international news sources from 172 countries!  It contains content from newspapers, wire services, and broadcast news transcripts.  You can also search for news sources by location.

We have the full C-SPAN collection which include every C-SPAN program aired since 1987 to present! This is an excellent resource for gathering information about U.S. politics.

International Newsstream is a collection of the most recent news content outside of the U.S. and Canada.  For only Canadian news, try our Canadian Newsstream.

For regional and local news, we have the Oregon Newspaper Source (a collection of 31 Oregon news sources), and Regional Business News.  We also have the Historic Oregon Newspaper database, which contains over 900,000 pages of Oregon Newspapers between 1846 to 2017.

America’s Historical Newspapers is ideal for really old content. It provides the full text to over 700 historical U.S. newspapers between 1690-1876.  And the Historical New York Times provides full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue ((1851).

Current Willamette faculty, staff, and students have off-campus access to these digital resources, and the general public are welcome to access these resources in the library.  If you don’t see what you need on our list of newspaper sources or have questions, please ask one of our knowledgeable library staff.  They would be happy to help!

* Source: microfilmworld.com/briefhistoryofmicrofilm.aspx

Written by John Repplinger


A Day at the Library

Circulation staff are kept busy answering questions about library services and policies, troubleshooting computer and printing problems, and directing patrons to various resources in the library and across campus. In addition to the full-time library staff, it takes a team of 30 circulation students to keep the library running smoothly!  We’ve asked some of our circulation staff and student workers what an average work day would be like for them.

Opening (by Charity Braceros-Simon)
Circulation students arrive 15 minutes before the library officially opens. We go through the building to turn on the computers, printers and other equipment so that they are ready for patrons to use. We also go through and make sure that supplies such as paper and staples are stocked. All of the materials that have been placed in the book drop overnight are checked in and sorted for reshelving. Finally, the bulk of the morning is spent processing Summit materials. We check in and sort all of the MOHL items that are being returned to us. We also receive the materials that Willamette students and faculty have requested from other libraries and place them on the hold shelf for check out.

Weekends (by Karla Gutierrez Hernandez)
On Friday and Saturday, there are often only a few students using the library. It is mostly quiet on both floors, but walking around to take a headcount encourages student workers to check and see if anything needs to be shelved or cleaned. It is also when we check for any issues with security or equipment. Weekend shifts are a good time to catch up on any shelf reading, organize our work space at the circulation desk, and restock our office supplies. Student managers inform student assistants if there are any special projects that need to be completed, such as taking down or putting up new displays. Making these shifts enjoyable and productive is all about finding balance by dividing the tasks among staff and allowing some down time.

Closing (by Shannon Lee)
Working the closing shift at the Mark O. Hatfield Library is a very similar process to tucking a child into bed. First, we send home all of the library’s friends with the promise that they may come back tomorrow for more learning and fun. Next, though we don’t use toothbrushes, we help the library stay clean by clearing the whiteboards and picking up any stray books. We then tuck the library into bed, pushing in the chairs and making sure there is no garbage around to give the library nightmares. One simply cannot forget to read the library an exciting bedtime story about taking the final gate count and unlocking the book drop. Finally, we turn off the lights, lock the doors, and say a soft goodnight to our dearest library.


Hatfield Halloween Hunt

The Hatfield Halloween Hunt…  (Oct 29-31st)

Five clues have been hidden in the library and on its website.  Complete a specific task to discover a hidden word. Collect all five words and then arrange them to solve the riddle below.  Drop off this completed form at the circulation desk by midnight on October 31st for a small prize and a chance to win a $15 Bistro gift card!  

Clue #1: Blitz’s Prof. Mustard placed the book “Ketchup and Mayo” on reserve. Find it.

Clue #2: Blitz found a historical photo of Waller Hall’s fire. Find it in the Archives (2nd floor).

Clue #3: Blitz loves books by Edgar Allan Poe. Find books by Poe (2nd floor stacks).

Clue #4: Blitz has an online Library Guide (LibGuide) for his College Colloquium course.  Find it.

Clue #5: Blitz wrote the biology thesis “Binturong of Willamette.” It is online in the Academic Commons. Find it.

The riddle: Why was Blitz late to Willamette’s Hauntcert?  
(University Chamber Orchestra/Wind Ensemble concert on Sunday, Oct 28th, 3:00 p.m., Hudson Hall)

____________    ____________  a   ____________    ____________    ____________

Your name & email:  ________________________     ___________________________

Copies of the entry form are also available at the circulation desk.  For questions or comments, contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu


Improvements, One Step at Time

By Craig Milberg, Mark O. Hatfield Library Director

It is hard to believe that the MOHL is over 30 years old, which is middle-aged for an academic library.  As the building and its furnishings age, we continually strategize about how to improve the student experience when using the library. Improvements to the building and furnishings should be evident, but are they? How many of the following have you noticed?

 

– New rolling white boards (summer 2017)

– New rolling tables, chairs, & alcove paint color, first floor of library (summer 2017)

– New seating styles (2017)

– Additional seating due to the popularity of new seats (2018)

– Additional mini laptop tables (2018)

– New white boards on table tops and group study room walls (2018)

– Replaced 40 old wood chairs with cushioned chairs, first floor of library (2018)

 

Several of the improvements came from feedback from ASWU and individual students, but there is always more that can be done. The library and WITS staff spent a considerable amount of energy last year developing a first-floor renovation plan that would move the WITS help desk into the library, greatly expand student seating options, and improve the 24-hour space.

While this renovation has been placed on hold while the University deals with more pressing projects, we want to continue to make progress until a major renovation can be done.  We really want student feedback on our next project.

Should we improve access to electrical outlets on the first floor (summer 2019)?  What other ideas do you have?  Stop by the library and tell Craig your ideas, or drop him an email (cmilberg@willamette.edu).