Faculty Colloquium: Melissa Marks

Please join us on Thursday, October 8, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/93049348010

for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: Functional Annotation of TonB Dependent Receptors Involved in Stress Resistance – Results and Reflections from a Cross-Institutional Collaboration

Presenter: Melissa Marks, Associate Professor of Biology

Melissa Marks

Abstract:  Vitamins and minerals are critical for proper functioning of all living organisms. Maintaining the proper balance of minerals, or metal ions, is critical for resistance to stress caused by normal metabolic processes. In Gram negative bacteria, metal transport across the outer membrane is often facilitated by members of a diverse and poorly understood family of surface proteins known as TonB-Dependent Receptors/Transporters (TBDRs). In the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that several predicted, but uncharacterized, TBDRs are important for metal ion homeostasis. In collaboration Lisa Bowers, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Biology, St. Olaf College) and our students, we are in the process of functionally annotating this group of TBDRs by characterizing their substrates, physiological roles, and genetic regulation. In this presentation, I will provide a big picture overview of our scientific endeavors. I’ll also share my reflections on establishing a new cross-institution collaboration and some of the unexpected benefits of doing collaborative science in an undergraduate research environment.

Bill Kelm and Kathryn Nyman
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Rosa León Zayas

Please join us on Thursday, October 1, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/95698064708

for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: Going Deeper: Microbial Diversity and Metabolic Potential in the Marine Deep Biosphere

Presenter: Rosa León Zayas, Assistant Professor of Biology

Rosa Zayas

Abstract:  Exploration of the deep ocean has expanded our understanding of oceanic ecosystems, including continental margins and mid-ocean ridges, and yet still little is known about these deep sites on Earth. Some of the most poorly understood ecosystems are subsurface environments, particularly as it pertains to the distribution of archaea and their associated metabolic abilities. In this presentation, I will share an overview of some of the work I conducted during my junior research leave, which includes the discussion of a recently published analysis of the archaeal community structure and their potential ecological roles, and preliminary results on our most recently NSF funded work on PET Plastic degrading bacteria. Overall, this research seeks to reveal the metabolic potential of novel archaeal lineages, which significantly contributes to our overall understanding of the ecosystem function of subsurface sedimentary environments.Additionally, by studying the metabolic capacity of microorganisms that degrade PET Plastic, we can better understand their mechanisms for degrading one of the largest sources of pollutants, single use plastics, with the ultimate goal of building upon that potential to generate a more efficient degradation process in order to eventually assist with the reduction of this man made environmental pollutant.

Bill Kelm and Kathryn Nyman
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Jameson Watts

Please join us on Thursday, April 16, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/s/217971917

for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: The Data Science of (Oregon) Wine: Machine Learning with a Decadent Dataset

Presenter: Jameson Watts, Assistant Professor of Marketing

Jameson Watts

Abstract: What makes an Oregon Pinot so unique? Which taste profiles command the highest price premium? How do Oregon wines compare to famous Pinot-producing regions like Burgundy in France? Using a unique dataset of reviews, ratings and prices, I will answer these questions and more. Plus, find out which Oregon wines give you the most bang for your buck!

…participants are encouraged to open a bottle during the presentation and post it (a picture or description) in the comments.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Joyce Millen

Please join us on Thursday, April  2, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/861290433

for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Two-Part Presentation and Discussion:
Ethnomedicine and Comparative Health System Responses to COVID-19

Presenter: Joyce Millen, Associate Professor of Anthropology, African Studies and Public Health Ethics, Advocacy and Leadership

Joyce Millen

Abstract: Before COVID-19 altered all of our lives, I had been planning to present this early April 2020 faculty colloquium on ethnomedicine—a branch of medical anthropology concerned with the cross-cultural study of health, illness and healing. But with the advent of this pandemic, I suspect more of us may be interested in a discussion about comparative health systems in response to COVID-19. Therefore, I will begin with a bit of my former plan, to examine the nexus between Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and western medicine, but then I will spend the latter half of my presentation discussing how different countries around the world are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. What might the divergent responses tell us about specific countries, and what might the varied responses tell us about the state of global health more generally?

I suspect that many of us will continue to ponder these questions—the differing levels of preparedness and response—for years into the future. My hope is that we may begin a discussion at the colloquium that will spark new questions and conversations we can build upon as the pandemic unfolds and eventually ends.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Ana Montero

Please join us on Thursday, March 19, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/405796806

for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Ana Montero, Professor of Spanish
Ana Montero

Title: Channeling Laureola: Female Agency and the Influence of Cárcel de amor in Celestina

Abstract: Medieval literature scholars have often compared fifteenth-century Spanish best sellers Cárcel de amor (Diego de San Pedro, 1492) and Celestina (Fernando de Rojas? 499?) by focusing mainly on their specific representation of love, their respective embodiment of the genre of sentimental fiction, and the differences and similarities in the depiction of their main male characters. In this presentation, I will focus on the connection between the female protagonists and how, in both books, their sexuality is portrayed as pathological and in need to be controlled by masculine authority. Both Laureola, in Cárcel de amor, and Melibea, in Celestina, are regarded as ultimately responsible for their fate; the former suffered imprisonment in her father's fortress while the latter plunged to her death from the tower of the paternal manor. For different reasons and with different endings, both women resist the traditionally passive role expected of them within the context of patriarchal society. In this presentation, the goal is to analyze the potential interplay of political ethics and fiction. This will help to show that Cárcel de amor and Celestina probably evince complex reactions to the presence of a woman in power, queen Isabella I of Castile.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Melinda Butterworth

Note, this event for March 12th has been canceled, and we will do our best to try and reschedule it at a later time.

Presenter: Melinda Butterworth, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Melinda Butterworth

Title: The Shifting Geographies of Vector-Borne Diseases in the United States
Abstract: Infectious diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality across the globe, including in the United States. Global trade, travel, and climate change, among other factors, all further serve to reshape and reassemble our understandings of infectious disease geographies. As pathogens relocate, we work to predict where they will move next, and how to contain, manage, and respond to them. This is particularly obvious at the moment as the global community faces the COVID-19 outbreak, but the challenges experienced in its detection and containment are by no means unique. In this talk I will address the geographies of two diseases in the United States: dengue fever and Lyme disease. Drawing on mixed research methods, including a climate-driven mosquito model, surveys, and interviews, I discuss the work I have conducted with students investigating these (re)emerging diseases in the US, including environmental drivers, case detection, and the responses of citizen and health communities.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there. Also, remember to note the move to Thursday afternoons this semester.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Erik Noftle

Please join us on Thursday, March 5, at 4:10 p.m. in Ford Hall 102 for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Erik Noftle, Associate Professor of Psychology

Title: Personality Dynamics and Development Erik Noftle

Abstract: In this talk, I describe two research efforts I completed during my sabbatical, which have to do with personality dynamics and personality development. Personality captures important, enduring psychological characteristics of a person, which are relatively consistent across situations and time, such as the traits of Extraversion or Conscientiousness. Personality dynamics concerns how personality functions: how it fluctuates across the short term, from moments to weeks. Personality development concerns how personality matures: how it changes across the long term, from years to decades. In one project, I examined how situation experience and trait-relevant behavior fluctuated within a representative span of daily life across three adult age groups: young adults, middle-aged adults, and retired adults. Results suggest that some fascinating changes in personality processes take place across the adult lifespan. In the other project, I tracked college students across the entirety of college and investigated how their personality traits affected–and were affected by—different aspects of adjustment to college. Results suggest that not only does personality predict how students are later faring when it comes to academics or their social lives, but also that how students are faring predicts their future personality traits. In sum, these findings contribute to a growing consensus that instead of personality being something about a person that’s pretty much fixed once one is a young adult, personality is, in fact, an aspect of a person that continues to be sensitive and responsive to the environment and dynamic across much of the lifespan.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there. Also, remember to note the move to Thursday afternoons this semester.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Andrew Schwartz

Please join us on Thursday, February 27th, at 4:10 p.m. in the Carnegie Building for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Wm. Andrew Schwartz, Executive Director, Center for Process Studies
Assistant Professor of Process and Comparative Theology at the Claremont School of Theology Andrew Schwartz

Title: Putting Philosophy to Work: A Relational Worldview for the Common Good

Abstract: Change your thinking; change the world. Philosophy has gotten a bad rap. As an academic discipline, it is mocked as irrelevant to modern society. But bias against philosophy doesn’t mean we don’t have one. We all have a basic worldview. This is as true for whole civilizations as for individuals, a point driven home daily as the dire consequences of the Western worldview—the most urgent being climate change—are now inescapable. But if Western philosophy has brought us to this razor’s edge, would another one be any better?

In this faculty colloquium, professor Wm. Andrew Schwartz will introduce the fundamentals of process philosophy and explore some implications for rethinking science, theology, ecology, and education.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Note: There will also be a special TGIF reception following the lecture that will be open to faculty from all schools. This is the second TGIF event this semester with Colloquium speakers from across the University. These opportunities for cross-university gathering and conversation are sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Mike Chasar

Please join us on Thursday, February 20th, at 4:10 p.m. in Ford Hall 204 for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Mike Chasar, Associate Professor of English Mike Chasar

Title: Don’t Stop Believin’: The Poetry of Pop Music

Abstract: When you listen to or sing along with your favorite pop songs—Guns ‘N Roses, Beyoncé, Journey, Ke$ha, Whitney Houston—do you ever imagine that all of their stylized Ohs and Oooohs are something other than emotive overflows or opportunities for singers to display their vocal prowess? Indeed, those very “nonsense” sounds—so frequently overlooked that they are often omitted from liner notes and song transcriptions—are in fact the key to recognizing not only the poetry of pop music but also how it connects to two thousand years’-worth of verse stretching back to ancient Greece. Part dance party, part informal discussion, and maybe part sing-along, today’s presentation will shed new light on how some of the music you love or love to hate makes you one of the largest poetry audiences in history.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there. Also, remember to note the move to Thursday afternoons this semester.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Kyle Stephenson

Please join us on Thursday, February 13th, at 4:10 p.m. in Ford Hall 102 for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Kyle Stephenson, Assistant Professor of Psychology Kyle Stephenson

Title: Better Sex Through Science: Building and Testing an Online Program to Treat Sexual Dysfunction

Abstract: Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) – distressing and long-lasting impairments in sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, or pain – affects 15-30% of women worldwide. FSD is associated with poorer relational satisfaction, mental health, and overall quality of life, making it essential to create, test, and disseminate effective treatments. Research has suggested that Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) are effective in treating FSD when provided face-to-face by professional sex therapists. However, only a small portion of women who could benefit are receiving these treatments. Access is limited by many factors including embarrassment, cost, and lack of available expertise. Web-based interventions hold the promise of addressing many of these barriers, vastly expanding access to traditionally underserved populations. Over the past four years, our research team has constructed eSense: an online platform housing self-guided, evidence-based therapy for FSD. Three feasibility studies have suggested that eSense is a clear, usable, and potentially efficacious program to address FSD. This talk will include information on the nature and causes of FSD, a description of evidence-based sex therapies, an overview of eSense with example therapeutic activities, and a summary of results from feasibility studies.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there. Also, remember to note the move to Thursday afternoons this semester.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators