Newspaper Resources at Willamette

Some common questions that librarians receive at the reference desk revolve around newspapers.  Does the library have this newspaper?  How far back does your subscription go?  How do you use the microfilm machine to read old newspapers?

Before the Internet, most libraries subscribed to newspapers that were mailed to their campuses through the U.S. Postal Service.  Depending on where the newspapers were printed, it could take several days to receive the most recent edition.  And if you were lucky, the paper arrived undamaged!

Newspapers take up a lot of precious shelf space, especially when they are published daily.  To alleviate the space required for old newspapers, they were “photographed” onto microfilm or microform.  Even though the first uses of microfilm occurred as early as 1859, this technology wasn’t embraced by libraries until the 1960 and 1970s.*  However, this technology is cumbersome to use and not a big favorite among library users.  The Hatfield Library no longer receives newspapers on microfilm, but we still have a large collection of older microfilm titles.

Nowadays we access most of our newspapers digitally through the Internet, where they are much more accessible and not confined by physical space limitations.  Of course, digital newspapers require Internet access, electrical power, and often charge expensive access rates.  Technology has allowed us to scan old texts for recognizable words; we can search these words digitally and often bring up that exact instance used within a newspaper.  It certainly beats sifting through stacks of print newspapers or scrolling through rolls of microfilm!

The library continues to receive a number of important regional newspapers in print as well as a selection of national newspapers. Many of these titles are also available digitally; library users are able to access an incredibly wide range of newspapers online through our list of newspaper databases.  If you have a specific newspaper in mind, try looking it up in the Newsbank A-Z list of over 6,500 news sources.  Frequent questions we receive for specific newspapers include the Oregonian, Statesman Journal, Register Guard, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.

If you’re looking for general news, a great place to start is Access World News. This resource pulls from over 5,900 U.S. news sources and international news sources from 172 countries!  It contains content from newspapers, wire services, and broadcast news transcripts.  You can also search for news sources by location.

We have the full C-SPAN collection which include every C-SPAN program aired since 1987 to present! This is an excellent resource for gathering information about U.S. politics.

International Newsstream is a collection of the most recent news content outside of the U.S. and Canada.  For only Canadian news, try our Canadian Newsstream.

For regional and local news, we have the Oregon Newspaper Source (a collection of 31 Oregon news sources), and Regional Business News.  We also have the Historic Oregon Newspaper database, which contains over 900,000 pages of Oregon Newspapers between 1846 to 2017.

America’s Historical Newspapers is ideal for really old content. It provides the full text to over 700 historical U.S. newspapers between 1690-1876.  And the Historical New York Times provides full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue ((1851).

Current Willamette faculty, staff, and students have off-campus access to these digital resources, and the general public are welcome to access these resources in the library.  If you don’t see what you need on our list of newspaper sources or have questions, please ask one of our knowledgeable library staff.  They would be happy to help!

* Source: microfilmworld.com/briefhistoryofmicrofilm.aspx

Written by John Repplinger


Oregon: The Early Years

One hundred and sixty years ago, on February 14, 1859, Oregon was officially admitted to the union as the 33rd state.  In the grand scheme of things, that really isn’t that long ago but the years leading up to and shortly after becoming a state are jammed pack with interesting stories.  Long before traders, explorers and pioneers began showing up in the state, many indigenous tribes called this area home.  The history of Oregon and the stories of the Native Americans and the settlers who ventured here along the Oregon Trail make fascinating topics for exploration.  In tribute to Oregon’s statehood, it seems appropriate for us to learn more about the native peoples of this land and the early Westerners that settled the Oregon Territory and eventually created this state.  To start you out on this exploration, check out the WU Reads Reading Guide for some interesting books on early Oregon history.


Faculty Colloquium: Emily Drew

Please join us on Friday, February 1st, at 3 p.m. in the Oregon Civic Justice Center for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Emily Drew, Associate Professor of Sociology
Title: Making Black Lives Matter on a Historically White Campus
Abstract: In this paper, Prof. Drew analyzes antiracist pedagogical practices through her experiences with teaching “BlackLivesMatter.” She argues that studying and engaging in a movement taking place in real-time, facilitates—perhaps necessitates—legitimizing activists’ knowledge, generating conflict in the classroom, and breaking through the veil of postraciality in the classroom and beyond. Drawing upon student-generated intervention projects in which the goal was to make Black life matter on campus, she concludes that projects about Black death are well-received as long as they do not inconvenience anyone. However, interventions directly challenging whiteness on campus produce more significant resistance and backlash.

Note: There will also be a special TGIF reception following the lecture that will be open to faculty from all three schools. This is the second TGIF event this semester with Colloquium speakers from across the University. These opportunities for cross-University gathering and conversation are sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin


Nicholsloy Studio collection available for researchers

The Nicholsloy Studio collection is processed and open to researchers! This amazing collection documents the careers of local Salem artists Sandra and Dave Nichols, who together comprise Nicholsloy Studio. It includes correspondence with artists and writers; original prints and layouts of rebeat, a zine created by Nicholsloy Studio; an extensive collection of zines by other artists; a collection of materials related to the Beat Generation; original art, prints, and mail art by Nicholsloy Studio and other artists; and notebooks.

Sandra and Dave met at Chemeketa Community College in the late 1970s when Sandra was a faculty member who taught English and Creative Writing and Dave was a student. Their relationship permeates through their creative process as they often work together to make their art. They create work individually as “nic” and “sloy” and collaboratively as Nicholsloy Studio.

Nicholsloy Studio’s work combines found objects, including intricately designed cardboard pieces, and written words or phrases to create imaginative and visually stunning pieces. Sandra is a poetry and poetic-fiction writer who arranges her written work in drawings, paintings, and canvas sculpture. Dave creates recycled cardboard sculptures, games, jewelry, musical instruments, and puzzles as well as oil paintings and colored pencil drawings. As artists, videographers, and collectors of art and zines, they are key figures in Salem, Oregon’s underground art scene.

Sandra and Dave have been featured in individual and group exhibitions in Oregon and Washington, including the Bush Barn Art Center, Chemeketa Community College Art Gallery, the Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Their works can be found in public and private collections throughout the United States, including the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry in Miami, Florida.

For more information about the Nicholsloy Studio collection and access to this collection, please see the finding aid. This collection was processed thanks to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant Willamette University received to increase accessibility to the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive.


Schools of Theology

Schools of Theology: From Kimball to Claremont

By Ilan Palacios Avineri ’18, Sybil Westenhouse Intern (Fall 2018)

Just a century ago, Willamette University was home to the Kimball School of Theology, a humble seminary located on the north-side of the contemporary campus. Established in 1906 under Dean Henry Kimball, the school’s mission was simple: to provide the necessary education for those seemingly called by God to the Christian ministry.
In its own words, the Kimball School was a divine place, in which young adults “may establish their faith and equip themselves for service.”1 This mission statement proved palatable despite the school’s financial difficulties and Kimball managed to maintain a steady stream of enrolled students. As a result, the College’s monthly bulletins frequently boasted of its budding membership and spoke optimistically of Kimball’s role in the forthcoming “spiritual conquest of the world.”2 Despite this optimism, the school’s marketing materials expressed a deep insecurity in the role of its Christianity in an increasingly scientific world.

In one public brochure, the author describes the physical door of Kimball as a spiritual magnet which draws those of great intelligence towards further training in Christian education. Completing the metaphor, they then suggest that this positive pole of consecrated life is opposed by “the negative forces of scientific research.”3 Not only did the seminary feel the need to market itself in opposition to another force, something that a confident institution would likely refrain from doing, but the binary drawn evokes biblical notions of good and evil. Scientific research is not simply presented as a worthy yet ultimately worse option for young people than Kimball, but as a wicked alternative. In a similar vein, a bulletin from October 1922 proclaimed that Kimball is “modern without being destructive,” as well as “old fashioned without being old fogy.”4 Once more, the school attempted to market itself as the moral alternative to the modernity of science which the bulletin characterizes as “destructive.” Moreover, by describing the school as “old-fashioned” and affixing the caveat not “old fogy,” Kimball expressed a palpable anxiety that prospective students may view the school as out of touch with the modern advancements of scientific research.

Attempting to preempt this view among potential students, Kimball’s marketing materials stressed the value of the school’s Christian bent in utilitarian terms. In a brochure from July 1927, the authors write that the Kimball school stands as an “outpost of a new day of Christian usefulness.”5 By marketing the school’s teachings as “useful,” Kimball seemed to identify a societal desire for higher education to be applicable to the needs of the individual. While this admission is important, by addressing the need for spiritual education to be “useful” in a productive capacity, the school undercut its own mission statement: to provide teaching to young people so that they “may establish their faith and equip themselves for service in the ministry.” Finally, by forecasting the dawn of a new day in Christian “usefulness,” the brochure effectively conceded that the power of Christianity had waned considerably in the 19th century and was in desperate need of a rebirth.

While Kimball’s history is a fascinating case-study of the battle between Christianity and science in the 20th century, the tension between the two has persisted well into the 21st century. In recent years for example, Willamette has considered reestablishing a school of theology on campus by partnering with the Claremont School of Theology (CST). Such a move would enable the university to provide more resources to students captivated by religion and theology. Although this move might signal a “new day in christian usefulness” to some, Willamette is making clear in its public announcements that the CST would bring a “progressive approach to theological education” to the Pacific Northwest.6  By including the word “progressive” Willamette is sending a message to secular students that the advent of the Claremont school would not be the first step in a slow religious conquest of the curriculum. The very fact that the term “progressive” is included, presumably in an attempt to preempt the reservations of secular students and donors, is a testament to the waning authority of religion in American universities. Ultimately, it appears as though Kimball’s fears were wholly justified. Now, it is up to us to decide whether or not its materialism and empiricism, is alone a sufficient guide with which to navigate both our studies and our lives.

 


 

1. Bulletin, Kimball School of Theology, October 1922, Vol. 2, No. 2.

2. Bulletin, Kimball School of Theology, February 1930, Vol. 9, No. 1.

3. Brochure, Kimball School of Theology, July 1928, Vol. 7, No. 3.

4. Bulletin, Kimball School of Theology, October 1922, Vol. 2, No2.

5. Brochure, Kimball School of Theology, July 1927.

6. “Willamette University, Claremont School of Theology to explore partnership.” Willamette University. http:// willamette.edu/cst/ (November 6th, 2018).


Faculty Colloquium: Hector Aguero

Please join us Friday, January 25, at 3 p.m. in Fine Arts West 133 for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Hector Aguero, Assistant Professor of Music Hector Aguero

Title: Maestro for a Semester

Abstract: During his pre-tenure research leave, Professor Héctor Agüero furthered his professional development agenda and fostered his artistic growth by accepting guest conducting invitations from the New Jersey Youth Symphony, the Elkhart County Youth Symphony (Indiana), and the Goshen College Symphony and All-Campus Band. He was also chosen, through a competitive application process, to participate in the 15th Annual International Conductors Workshop and Competition. Agüero was ultimately chosen as the top winner for this international competition and is now able to add this honor to his growing list of professional accomplishments. Agüero discusses these and other musical activities pursued during his leave semester.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


A Day at the Library

Circulation staff are kept busy answering questions about library services and policies, troubleshooting computer and printing problems, and directing patrons to various resources in the library and across campus. In addition to the full-time library staff, it takes a team of 30 circulation students to keep the library running smoothly!  We’ve asked some of our circulation staff and student workers what an average work day would be like for them.

Opening (by Charity Braceros-Simon)
Circulation students arrive 15 minutes before the library officially opens. We go through the building to turn on the computers, printers and other equipment so that they are ready for patrons to use. We also go through and make sure that supplies such as paper and staples are stocked. All of the materials that have been placed in the book drop overnight are checked in and sorted for reshelving. Finally, the bulk of the morning is spent processing Summit materials. We check in and sort all of the MOHL items that are being returned to us. We also receive the materials that Willamette students and faculty have requested from other libraries and place them on the hold shelf for check out.

Weekends (by Karla Gutierrez Hernandez)
On Friday and Saturday, there are often only a few students using the library. It is mostly quiet on both floors, but walking around to take a headcount encourages student workers to check and see if anything needs to be shelved or cleaned. It is also when we check for any issues with security or equipment. Weekend shifts are a good time to catch up on any shelf reading, organize our work space at the circulation desk, and restock our office supplies. Student managers inform student assistants if there are any special projects that need to be completed, such as taking down or putting up new displays. Making these shifts enjoyable and productive is all about finding balance by dividing the tasks among staff and allowing some down time.

Closing (by Shannon Lee)
Working the closing shift at the Mark O. Hatfield Library is a very similar process to tucking a child into bed. First, we send home all of the library’s friends with the promise that they may come back tomorrow for more learning and fun. Next, though we don’t use toothbrushes, we help the library stay clean by clearing the whiteboards and picking up any stray books. We then tuck the library into bed, pushing in the chairs and making sure there is no garbage around to give the library nightmares. One simply cannot forget to read the library an exciting bedtime story about taking the final gate count and unlocking the book drop. Finally, we turn off the lights, lock the doors, and say a soft goodnight to our dearest library.


PNAA Processed Collections

Two (soon-to-be three!) Pacific Northwest Artists Archive (PNAA) collections are processed and open to the public. Over the next 16 months, 13 more collections will be processed thanks to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant Willamette University recently received to increase accessibility to this interesting and important Archive.

The inaugural PNAA collection was the Robert Bibler papers. Robert Bibler is a professional artist and retired college instructor who currently resides in Salem, Oregon, with his wife, artist Carol Hausser. He taught studio art and film studies at Chemeketa Community College in Salem, Oregon from 1973 to 2003. Bibler’s love of classic film inspired him to coordinate two film series: The Amherst Film Cooperative (1972) at the University of Amherst in Amherst, Massachusetts, which he developed with John Morrison and The Wednesday Evening Film Series at Chemeketa Community College (1974-2003) and the Historic Elsinore Theatre (2004-2015), which he edited and planned with Leonard Held.

Bibler has exhibited artwork professionally since 1974. His works can be found in private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest, including the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, as well as in cities in the eastern United States. One of Bibler’s paintings, the official portrait of former Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt, was on display at the Oregon State Capitol from 1993 until 2011.

The Robert Bibler papers include newspaper articles, photographs, a scrapbook, sketches and drawings, digital files, promotional fliers, brochures, and correspondence concerning Bibler’s commission to paint the official portrait of former Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt and his coordination of The Amherst Film Cooperative and The Wednesday Evening Film Series. The collection also includes greeting cards and mail art from Sandra and Dave Nichols, who comprise Nicholsloy Studio.

For more information about the Robert Bibler papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid.

The second processed collection is the Claudia Cave papers. Claudia Cave is a professional artist who currently resides with her spouse, Kent Sumner, in Corvallis, Oregon, where she also maintains her studio. Cave participated in the mail art movement between 1974 and 2003. The mail art movement (also known as postal art or correspondence art) began in the late 1950s to early 1960s as artists corresponded with each other by sending artwork through the postal service. Cave’s mail art network included regional, national, and international artists.

Cave’s earlier works, including her mail art, are in black and white graphite while her paintings are in gouache and watercolor on paper. Cave’s work is described as vivid and dream-like. She often uses animal imagery, especially dogs, in her works to emphasize the animal-like nature of humans and the human-like nature of animals. Cave’s art has been shown in many exhibits and is included in public and private collections throughout the Pacific Northwest and the United States.

The Claudia Cave papers include materials related to her art career during the years 1974 to 2016. The collection includes: mail art, sketchbooks, slides of drawings and paintings, photographs, promotional fliers, newspapers, books, digital files, t-shirts, a cardboard cutout of Cave, and correspondence. 

For more information about the Claudia Cave papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid.

The third collection, the Nicholsloy Studio collection, is nearly processed and will be open soon. This collection includes materials documenting the careers of Sandra and Dave Nichols, correspondence with artists and writers, a collection of zines, and a collection of material related to the Beat Generation. 

Please check in regularly to the Archives’ blog for updates on the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive!


Finals Week Extended Study Hours

Christmas TreeThe Hatfield Library is now providing extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies provided by Bon Appetit and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 9:30 p.m. starting on Monday, Dec. 10th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 3 – Thursday, Dec. 6 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 7 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 9 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 10 – Friday, Dec. 15 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 17 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 17. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 21 through Jan. 1. Regular hours resume on Jan. 22.


Wonderful World of Winter

Winter is coming and we’re not talking about The Game of Thrones.  No, we’re talking about the time of year when the days are shorter, the nights are longer, and the weather is cooler.  In Salem, it’s a time of blustery days, soaking rains, and perhaps even the occasional snow storm.  This time of year can be a wonderful time to head for the coast to watch wild waves while avoiding the summer crowds.  If you don’t mind the rain, hikes at Silver Creek Falls can be rewarding–the falls are impressive with all the rain and the crowds are greatly diminished.  Or head to the mountain for snow fun of all kinds.  It is also prime time for wearing cozy sweaters, sitting by the fire, drinking cocoa, and–you guessed it–reading a good book!  If you need some good winter-themed reading material, check out our WU Reads Reading Guide.


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