Norma Paulus Memorial

There will be a memorial for Norma Paulus Saturday (4/27) here at Willamette University in Smith Auditorium at 2:00 p.m. with reception to follow in the Cat Cavern.  The event is open to the public. 
 
Here are two nice articles on Norma Paulus and her connection to Willamette: 
 
The Hatfield Archives does have Norma Paulus’ papers.  They are available to be viewed by appointment Monday-Friday 9 am – 12 pm and 1 pm – 4 pm.  There is a digital finding aid and some of the scrapbooks can be viewed online (or from the finding aid) as well.
 
Questions can be directed to archives@willamette.edu.

Faculty Colloquium: Raechelle Mascarenhas

Please join us on Friday, April 26th, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Raechelle Mascarenhas, Associate Professor of Economics Raechelle Mascarenhas Picture

Title: Do Foreign Aid Contributions Foster Cooperation and Generosity Amongst Donors?

Abstract:

This talk provides an overview of my research into two aspects of the motivations underlying foreign aid donations: cooperation and generosity.

The first part of the presentation explores whether donors cooperate when giving foreign aid to developing countries. The data on foreign aid flows is disaggregated by sector (such as education, health and governance) to examine if the sector receiving aid induces donors to coordinate or free-ride. Two allocation processes are tested: non-cooperative (Nash-Cournot) and cooperative (Lindahl). The empirical analysis strongly rejects the cooperative Lindahl model with evidence of most donors adhering to the non-cooperative Nash-Cournot model.

The second part of the presentation provides an analysis of the impact of systemic financial crises on foreign aid flows through direct bilateral transfers to developing countries and channeled through multilateral institutions. The study reveals that both bilateral and multilateral aid experience statistically significant declines after donor financial crises. However, multilateral aid experiences more severe and prolonged declines than bilateral aid. This is perhaps because donors, in the aftermath of the crises, tend to prioritize their strategic interests by not cutting back bilateral aid as much as multilateral aid. Donors also tie bilateral aid to purchases of goods and services to businesses in the donor country and this tends to reduce the concessionality and effectiveness of foreign aid.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Sue Koger

Please join us on Friday, April 19th, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Sue Koger, Professor Psychology

Title: Teaching Psychology for Sustainability: The why and how

Abstract: The behavioral sciences can make vital contributions to environmental sustainability efforts, as relevant basic and applied psychological research has grown considerably over the past dozen years. Recently, conservation biologists, environmental policy makers, and other experts have recognized the importance of engaging with experts on human behavior (i.e., psychologists) in order to effect behavioral change in a sustainable direction. Lagging behind this trend, however, is the curricular integration of psychology and environmental sustainability in most psychology or environmental science/studies programs (ESS). Consequently, most psychology majors are graduating with no background in applying the field to promoting sustainability, and ESS students lack explicit education focused on understanding and changing human behavior. This talk provides an introduction to the rationale for integrating sustainability topics into psychology courses, and psychological concepts into ESS classes, along with some strategies for doing so at the level of individual course units as well as full courses.

Note: Prof. Sue Koger has co-authored textbooks and numerous articles on Psychology for Sustainability, and is also the co-author of https://www.teachgreenpsych.com/, a website of Instructor Resources created to assist instructors from various departments (Psychology, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Sustainability Studies, etc.).

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Guest Lecture, Professor Dana Frank

On Tuesday evening, April 9, at 7:00pm Professor Dana Frank from the University of California at Santa Cruz will discuss the crisis in Honduras that is fueling immigration to the U.S.  She will be speaking in the Hatfield Room. This event is sponsored by International Studies, Latin American Studies, and History.  We hope to see you there.

Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?  Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup.

Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manual Zelaya.  In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the U.S. Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, U.S. policy in support of the regime, and the Congressional challenges to that policy.  Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the U.S., and the destructive impact of U.S. policy.

Dana Frank is the Professor of History Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Her books include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and the Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. Policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino U.S.A, regularly on Democracy Now!, and on other outlets.  Professor Frank has testified about Honduras before the U.S. House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

 

(Content originally from campus email annoucement.)


Faculty Colloquium: Ashley Nixon

Please join us on Friday, April 12th, at 3 p.m. in the Carnegie Building for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Ashley Nixon, Associate Professor of Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior Ashley Nixon
Title: Globalizing Emotional Labor: How to Account for Cultural Differences?

Abstract: Increasingly, work stress and its negative consequences are receiving attention as the costs to individuals, organizations, and our society mount. Emotional labor, or process byIncreasingly, work stress and its negative consequences are receiving attention as the costs to individuals, organizations, and our society mount. Emotional labor, or process by which employees manage their emotions to meet organizationally mandated emotional display rules (Hochschild, 1983), is a work stressor that is associated with a range of cognitive, affective, and behavioral strains for employees. Emotional labor is particularly relevant and detrimental for service workers, an occupational group that is rapidly growing globally.

In this talk, I will discuss a stream of research examining emotional labor in cross-cultural contexts. Several projects, conducted with a global research team, examine the impact of national, organizational, and individual level cultural differences on the emotional labor-strain process in the United States and Turkey. Cultural values at each level impact and interact to impact service employee strain. Additionally, a new research initiative developed with the support of WU, AGSM, and the Fulbright Specialist program will be discussed.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Note: There will also be a special TGIF reception following the lecture that will be open to faculty from all schools. This is the third TGIF event this semester with Colloquium speakers from across the University. These opportunities for cross-University gathering and conversation are sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Mark Sponenburgh papers

The Mark Sponenburgh papers have been processed and are open for researchers. This collection contains materials related to Sponenburgh’s careers as an artist, educator, and scholar. Examples of these materials include photographs, drawings, slides of sculpture by Sponenburgh and other artists, correspondence, exhibition fliers and pamphlets, academic journals, newspaper articles, newsletters and honors regarding the Monuments Men, documents concerning the creation of the Hogue-Sponenburgh collection at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, syllabi and notes for courses taught by Sponenburgh, documents concerning the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan, and designs and proposals for public sculptures created by Sponenburgh.

Mark Ritter Sponenburgh was born on June 15, 1918, in Cadillac, Michigan. He studied sculpture at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan from 1939 to 1940 and Wayne University in Detroit, Michigan from 1940 to 1941. In 1942 Sponenburgh enlisted in the United States’ Army. His unit participated in the D-Day landings at Normandy, and advanced through France, Holland, Belgium, and the Rhineland during World War II. In June 1945 Sponenburgh requested to transfer to the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archive (MFAA) division. As a member of the Monuments Men, Sponenburgh assisted in operations to transfer the items to the Munich Central Collecting Point for sorting, cataloguing, and eventual restitution.

After the end of his military service, Sponenburgh continued his graduate studies at the Ecôle des Beaux Arts in Paris, France. In 1946 he moved to Eugene, Oregon for a faculty position in Architecture and Allied Arts at the University of Oregon. In 1951 Sponenburgh traveled to Egypt as a Fulbright Scholar at the American Research Center in Cairo, where he continued his studies and research in sculpture, carving, and ancient Egyptian sculpture and art. He returned to Eugene in 1953.

In 1957 he was commissioned by the government of Pakistan to establish the National College of Arts in Lahore, where he served as principal (Dean) of the college and a professor. While working in Pakistan, he organized the first national exhibition of regional Swat folk art. In 1961 Sponenburgh returned to Oregon by invitation from fellow MFAA veteran Gordon Gilkey to establish the Art History program at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Sponenburgh taught at Oregon State until 1983, when he retired as Professor Emeritus.

Sponenburgh was a member of many influential and prestigious organizations including the International Association of Egyptologists, the Royal Society of Arts, the Royal Society of Antiquaries, the International Association of Art Historians, the American Research Center in Egypt, and the Oxford Society. In 1990 Sponenburgh and his wife, Janeth Hogue-Sponenburgh, donated their extensive art collection to Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. This collection helped secure the creation of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University in 1998. The Mark and Janeth Sponenburgh Gallery includes over 250 Ancient, European, Middle Eastern, and Asian art works and historical artifacts.

As a lifelong sculptor, Sponenburgh created over 170 pieces of art in stone, wood, and mixed media, which explored human and animal forms and ocean wave patterns. His work can be found in private and public exhibits throughout the United States and abroad including the Detroit Institute of Arts (Madonna), the Portland Art Museum (Torso and Birds in Flight), the Hallie Ford Museum of Art (The Collector), Willamette University (Town and Gown), Oregon State University (bronze bust of Linus Pauling), the University of Oregon, and the United States’ Embassy in Cairo, Egypt.

For more information about the Mark Sponenburgh papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid. This collection was processed thanks to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant Willamette University received to increase accessibility to the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive.


National Poetry Month

The Academy of American Poets founded National Poetry Month in April 1996 to celebrate “poetry’s vital place in our culture.”  One of the primary goals of the month is to “highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets.” Over the years, Poetry Month has become a huge literary observance with readers, students, teachers, librarians, booksellers, publishers, and poets from around the world participating in this month-long celebration in a whole host of different ways.  Many special events and readings are scheduled to occur during April in honor of poetry. Over 100,000 National Poetry Month posters are distributed to schools, libraries, and bookstores each year.  On April 18, poetry lovers are encouraged to participate in “Poem in Your Pocket Day.” On this day, select a poem, carry it with you, and share it with others wherever you go!

To find out more about National Poetry Month, check out poets.org.  And go to the WU Reads Reading Guide for an interesting selection of recent books of poetry available in our collection.


Capturing WU’s Scholarly Output

Guest post written by Bill Kelm, Hatfield Library Systems Librarian

Everyone knows that the library collects books, journals, and DVDs, but did you know that we also collect some of the scholarly output of Willamette’s students, faculty and staff? The library maintains the Academic Commons, a virtual clearinghouse for student research and digital scholarship at Willamette University. The Commons represents an evolving set of services and digital collections that are a resource for Willamette faculty and students and for members of the extended community. Some of the collections are open to the public but others are limited to current WU students, faculty and staff.

Students can also access past print theses in the Archives as well.

Student research ranges from senior theses, publications, grant projects, performances, films, journals, and online exhibits. Highlights include the Senior Thesis Collections and the Willamette Sports Law Journal.  Some collections like the law journal are open to the public and indexed in the library catalog.  Most of the theses collections are restricted to current Willamette University users; over thirty departments have theses collections in the Commons.  Faculty in some departments require students to submit their senior thesis to the Academic Commons and other departments identify outstanding theses and recommend those student researchers submit their theses to the Commons.

Reviewing some of the theses other students have submitted in the past can be a great way for current students to get a sense of what a senior thesis in their major might look like and what kinds of subjects might make appropriate topics. A number of departments have decided to scan their past theses as well; the Biology Department probably has the largest collection with some theses going to back the 1940’s and 50’s.

Submitting a thesis is not the same as adding a new post to Facebook so when students submit their works, the documents will not automatically appear in the Academic Commons.  All of our librarians monitor the incoming theses in their specific subject areas. They work to ensure the accuracy of the the metadata (subjects, abstracts, etc.) before they officially release the paper into the Academic Commons. The level or quality of the work found in the Commons can vary greatly.  As mentioned previously, some departments add only what they consider honors work and others add all the theses written by their students.

The library is also encouraging Willamette faculty to publish in Open Access journals. When faculty do this, the library can then add their work to the Common’s Faculty Publications section for that department. Open Access Journals LogoRight now four departments have Faculty Publications in the Academic Commons. While many faculty might want to make sure they are getting their papers in ResearchGate or Academia, we want to make sure we can legally capture their research in Willamette’s Academic Commons.  Many of the publisher agreements that faculty sign only allow pre-print copies of their work to be placed in local digital repositories.

Take some time to checkout the Academic Commons.  Students, if you do not see your major or department represented, let us know and we will be happy to check with faculty in that department. Faculty, let us know if you want your department included in the ever expanding and increasingly important Academic Commons.


MOHL Research Awards

If you are a student and have written and researched an excellent paper, why not submit your paper for consideration for the MOHL Research Award?  Sponsored by the Hatfield Library, this award recognizes and rewards Willamette undergraduate students in any discipline who demonstrate outstanding research using library and information resources in writing a paper. Up to two awards of $500 each are available.

Student papers written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work are eligible to be considered for this award. The paper must be 7 pages or more in length and written in the current academic year (fall 2018/spring 2019). Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded. Award Announcement Image

Papers need to be submitted by the last day of finals May 14, 2019 at 5:00 pm. The faculty mentor who worked with the student during the production of the paper is asked to submit a statement of support and a copy of the assignment.  Faculty, please encourage your best student writers/researchers to apply!

For complete details and instructions see: http://library.willamette.edu/about/award


Faculty Colloquium: Henry Walker

Please join us on Friday, April 5th, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Henry M. Walker, Class of 1959 Distinguished Visiting Chair, Willamette UniversityHenry Walker Image

Title: Lab-based Pedagogy with Collaboration: An Example of a Flipped Classroom

Abstract: Much current discussion among college and university faculty focuses upon the notion of a flipped classroom. But how might that pedagogy be implemented in actual introductory courses, particularly in the sciences? This talk will first review several different pedagogical approaches commonly used in STEM fields, and then expand upon a workshop-style pedagogy.

At Grinnell College, for example, all introductory courses in biology, computer science, statistics, and psychology follow this workshop style pedagogy that integrates class lecture/discussion with laboratory experiments. Some sections of introductory chemistry and physics follow a similar approach.

To illustrate the general approach, the talk will highlight the pedagogy used in introductory computer science courses at Grinnell College, where students complete about 47 laboratory exercises, and I lecture about 4 hours per month (mostly in 5-10 minute segments). Altogether, these courses provide fine examples of one type of flipped classroom. As will be discussed, the approach pushes active learning to an extreme, and our experience suggests that this pedagogy allows us to cover about 20% more material than our traditional approach (with separate lectures and labs), and our students perform better on tests. The approach also seems to help student recruitment and retention.

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


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