May Flowers

pink dogwood bloomsAs the old saying goes, “April showers bring May flowers,” and that is certainly true all around the great Northwest!  Flowers, blossoms, and blooms are everywhere this time of year, delighting our eyes and our noses (unless we suffer from allergies).  From lilac bushes to dogwood trees, “everything’s coming up roses” right now.  Speaking of roses, they are just starting to open up in all their classic beauty and will brighten our lives all summer long.  And we can’t forget the delicate beauty of native plants such as trillium and camas.  So as the academic year winds down, remember to get outside, enjoy the glorious colors of the flowers that surround us, and “take time to smell the roses!”  And while you’re at it, why not check out the WU Reads Reading Guide for an interesting selection of flower-related books available from the University Libraries?

 

“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.” — Cicero


The Girl and Her Goat: Dale Whitney’s Photojournalism in Korea

By Tess Manjarrez ‘24

South Korea, 1963. Kim In Soon, dressed in a polka-dot dress and recently diagnosed with Hansen’s disease, or leprosy, hugs a young goat. In an era of harsh isolation tactics, Hansen’s was a cruel and lonely disease to catch. While Hansen’s is not a cause of death, it often causes permanent disfigurement and disabilities, which were treated globally as a cause for ostracism. Korean sufferers of the disease were moved from their communities and isolated on Sorok Island, a ‘leper colony’ for those whom society wished to forget. However, children in the early stages of Hansen’s were allowed to stay home on the condition that they were being treated and also not in contact with other children. Six-year-old Kim In Soon was one of these children, as photographed by Lois Dale Whitney.

Whitney, a self-taught photographer and Salem resident, was born in Chicago in 1923 and spent much of her life working in Europe, immortalizing events such as the aftermath of Hungary’s revolution, or the World Health Organization’s outreach in Italy. Whitney’s work in Europe even reached the UN, through the lenses of photo series from Turkey and Germany. In 1963, she took her photojournalism to Wedong Nyun, a village in Southern Korea being visited by a WHO-sponsored mobile leprosy team, and there met the young Kim In Soon, who had just started her first year of school. In a series of photos which capture the playfulness of the young girl as well as the isolation brought on by Hansen’s disease, Whitney’s work deeply humanizes a population made invisible by policy and social stigma.

Isolated as she was from other children, many pieces of Whitney’s photographs from this series feature In Soon engaging alone in otherwise communal activities –– we see her sitting, eating, and playing alone, even as the discolored spots characteristic of Hansen’s begin to appear on her legs and ankles. Whitney was even able to capture the moment in which Dr. Youn Keun Cha informed In Soon’s parents of her diagnosis.

child and goat

Kim In Soon, isolated after her leprosy diagnosis, hugs a young goat.

A successful photographer with achievements in both media photography and international photojournalism, Whitney moved to Oregon in 1979, where she remained until her death from cancer in 2003. Her legacy is one rich with stories and kept alive by occasional displays in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, The Portland Art Museum, Salem Public Library, and Salem Hospital, as well as on the World Health Organization’s own website. Many of her original photographs and associated typed or handwritten context are housed in Willamette University through the Pacific Northwest Artists Archives (PNAA).

While Whitney’s Korean series shows events such as WHO-backed doctors visiting villages or conducting treatments, the truly standout piece in this series is that of Kim In Soon with her goat. By Whitney’s own admittance, the black-and-white photograph is underexposed –– “A great shot”, she writes in her brief notes on the piece, found in the WU archives. “Photo was made inside a barn where we had taken shelter because of rain.” Perhaps the effect was mere happenstance, but its significance remains. The result of the underexposure is a totally black background, a stark contrast to In Soon’s bright dress and white goat. The goat itself seems to be smiling at the camera as In Soon cradles its head, a point of joy in an otherwise lonely future. Truly, with the dark background intent on swallowing them up, it seems in this photograph that Kim In Soon and her goat are alone in the world.

Such images beg the question: what, then, happened to Kim In Soon? Was she, like many victims of Hansen’s, sent to live on Sorok Island? Did she become permanently scarred, and ostracized as a result? Well, no. While Whitney did not add these details in her photograph description, the World Health Organization did indeed check in. Hansen’s disease is treatable, after all, as long as it is caught early. Kim In Soon needed only to continue taking her sulfone tablets regularly for more than a year. She recovered well and was able to continue her education, with the “arrested”, or inactive, lesions on her legs the only reminder of her illness.

child eating alone

Kim In Soon, eating alone.

The practice of sending those with Hansen’s disease to Sorok Island was officially abolished in 1963, the year Whitney met Kim In Soon, but of course, unofficial abandonment or isolation of ‘lepers’ continued. Indeed, it was not until 2007 that a bridge opened from Sorok Island to the mainland, finally connecting the historically isolated island and its residents to the rest of the country. Decades later, Lois Dale Whitney’s adventures, her notes, and the lives she captured on her 35mm negatives, remain immortalized and frozen in time — much like six-year-old Kim In Soon’s soft smile and the moment she shared with her young goat companion.

 

*Photograph 07 W.U., 1963, Subseries A, Box: 3, Folder: 7. Dale Whitney papers, WUA017. Willamette University Archives and Special Collections.


The Power of Poetry

wall with graffiti about poetryIn April 1996, the Academy of American Poets founded National Poetry Month to remind us all “that poets have an integral role to play in our culture and that poetry matters.”  One of the primary goals of the month is to “highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets.” Over the years, Poetry Month has become a huge literary observance with readers, students, teachers, librarians, booksellers, publishers, and, of course, poets from around the country participating in this month-long celebration in a whole host of different ways.  Many special activities, readings, and virtual events are scheduled to occur during April in honor of poetry. For instance, on April 29, poetry lovers are encouraged to participate in “Poem in Your Pocket Day.” On this day, select a poem, carry it with you, and share it with others wherever you go, including on social media using the hashtag #PocketPoem. Poetry can expose us to the beauty, anger, pain, and joy all around us; it makes us think, wonder, cry, rage, and chuckle.  Join us this month in celebrating the magic of poetry and poets!

To find out more about National Poetry Month, go to https://poets.org/national-poetry-month.  And check out the WU Reads Reading Guide for an interesting selection of recent books of poetry available in our collection.

If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. –Emily Dickinson


Coming Soon to a Library Near You

The University Libraries aspire to a number of goals as we develop services, collections, and library spaces.  These goals include ensuring that you have access to high quality information as easily and efficiently as possible.  Means of doing this include providing access to our catalog, online periodicals, and databases, or simply communicating when you have items waiting, and when we are open.  It also includes sharing news like this blog entry. There are many ways to accomplish our goals; our web presence and using email are among the most prevalent methods we use. Mobile Phone Interface

As smart phones and tablets have become more sophisticated and ubiquitous, we see that most individuals on campus own one or the other (or both).  A national trend shows that many users of these devices would prefer to use a downloaded App rather than view a website in a mobile browser to accomplish their transaction goals such as checking a bank balance or seeing if a requested book is ready to be picked up.  The individual Apps that many of us use for banking are a perfect example of this behavior.  While the University Libraries have long tried to make our websites accessible to smaller devices, we have decided to take the next step and roll out a Library App using Ex Libris’ Library Mobile service.

The App will be available on iOS and Android devices, and it will allow you to choose your home library (Law, PNCA or MOHL), access many of our resources and services including the catalog, find our hours, read our blog, sign up for notifications, allow us to inform you of your account status, and much more.  We anticipate going into beta testing in the next couple of weeks so watch for further announcements, download the App, try it out, and let us know what you think.  We look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions!


Food for Thought

fruits and vegetablesThe Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics invites us all to join them in celebrating National Nutrition Month. “During the month of March, everyone is invited to learn about making informed food choices and developing healthful eating and physical activity habits.”  This annual campaign features a different theme every year; this year’s theme is “Celebrate a World of Flavors” and highlights flavors from different cultures around the globe as a “tasty way to nourish ourselves and appreciate our diversity.”  What we eat can impact us in so many ways–hence the expression, “You are what you eat!” Studies show that there is a definite relationship between what we eat and the functioning of our brains so as members of the Willamette and higher education communities, it makes sense for us all to be striving towards healthy eating.  So help yourself to some leafy greens, grab an apple, and check out these nutrition-related titles listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

“Moderation. Small helpings. Sample a little bit of everything. These are the secrets of happiness and good health.” – Julia Child

 


Cranberries, Voter Registration, Tsunamis and Ronald Reagan: Congressional Collections

By Susan Irwin, University Archivist

What connects cranberries, voter registration, tsunamis, and Ronald Reagan?  The Mark O. Hatfield congressional collection. Contained within the collection are legal, economic, social and scientific data on such wide ranging topics as health care, the environment, social security, immigration, agriculture, national defense, technology, and transportation. The labeling of cranberry juice products, proposed voter registration legislation, appropriations requests for a tsunami warning system, and the inauguration of Reagan as President of the United States (Hatfield served as chairman of the inaugurations committee) are a few examples of the disparate documentary evidence found in the Hatfield collection.

Mark Hatfield’s political career spanned five decades.  Growing up in Salem, Oregon he graduated from Willamette University in 1943.  After serving in the U. S. Navy during World War II, he completed a Master’s Degree in Political Science at Stanford University. Returning to Salem, he worked as an assistant professor and Dean of Students at Willamette.

congress seal

Seal of the United States Congress.

Hatfield launched his political career in 1950, at the age of twenty-eight, by winning a seat in the state legislature, serving first in the Oregon House of Representatives and then the Oregon Senate.

Mark Hatfield

Mark Hatfield, Governor of Oregon

He went on to serve as Secretary of State for two years, followed by two terms as Governor. In 1966, Hatfield successfully ran for the U. S. Senate, where he remained until 1997.

Hatfield donated his political papers to Willamette University.  The collection spans his entire career, but the majority of records relate to his time in Congress. Hatfield’s collection, similar to other twentieth century congressional collections, is roughly twelve hundred cubic feet in size. In 2020, Willamette University archivists began processing the congressional records portion of the collection, arranging, describing and housing the records for preservation and access. Processing started with the Legislative materials, which touch upon nearly every legislative issue that came before the Senate from 1967-1996.  Work is currently focused on the Media and Constituent Service sections, which document communications and interactions between Hatfield and his constituents through newspaper columns, speeches, press releases, photographs and correspondence.  Once completed, processing will proceed on the campaign, office administration and memorabilia sections.

archives boxes

Hatfield records to be processed.

Processing will result in the creation of a guide describing the scope and content of the collection along with a folder-level inventory.

The collections of individual senators and representatives, such as the Hatfield collection, are an important source of information on the nation’s and the region’s economic, social, and legal issues, and are rich in white papers, technical reports, and scientific data not easily found elsewhere. The collection, along with the guide, opens to researchers on July 12, 2022.

In the meantime, check out the exhibit of Hatfield memorabilia, located on the second floor of the Hatfield Library.

Processing of the collection funded through the Institute of Museum and Library Services Library Services and Technology Act grant, administered through the State Library of Oregon and by the National Historical Publications & Records Commission’s (NHPRC) Access to Historical Records grant.

For more information on the collection contact archives@willamette.edu.


Black History Month

colorful graphic with the words black history monthAlthough February is now well known as Black History Month, it originally began as a week long celebration starting in 1926.  In 1969, a month long tribute was initially proposed by black educators and students at Kent State University.  When President Gerald Ford proclaimed Black History Month during the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976, recognition of it took hold across the country, particularly in educational institutions. Through the years, various themes have been chosen including recent themes such as “African Americans and the Vote,” The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity,” and this year’s theme, “Black Health and Wellness.”  This month provides us all with the chance to reflect on African American history, heritage, and culture, as well as to acknowledge accomplishments, influences, tragedies, and triumphs.

The library periodically puts together displays to highlight different areas of our collection; this month we’ve taken the opportunity to recognize Black History Month with a display featuring DVDs and mostly recent books from our collection.  You can explore the display on the first floor of the library or online; all materials are available for checkout.

For more information see:

A Proclamation on National Black History Month, 2022

Association for the Study of African American Life and History

Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month


A Stitch in Time

photo of embroidery

The art of embroidery has been around for centuries and spans most cultures around the world. Taking needle and thread to fabric or other materials to create beautiful scenes or patterns, embroidery is both challenging and gratifying.  The variety of stitches, techniques, and colors, adds to the complexity and richness of embroidery.  Through the ages, embroidery has been used to decorate ceremonial attire, religious objects, household objects, book bindings, wall hangings, pillow cases, denim work shirts, and much more. Machine embroidery emerged during the Industrial Revolution and now embroidery appears on items such as polo shirts and baseball hats.  Hand embroidery remains a vital part of society and like sourdough bread baking, stitching has become increasingly popular during the pandemic. February is designated as National Embroidery Month; join us in celebration by checking out one of these embroidery-related titles from our collection listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern; it will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that – one stitch at a time taken patiently and the pattern will come out all right like the embroidery.

—Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.


Winter Snow

Winter is almost upon us. This year the winter solstice for the northern hemisphere, the astronomical first day of winter, occurs on December 21st. The solstice marks the moment when the hemisphere is tilted farthest away from the sun, and as a result, is the shortest day of the year. Will winter bring snow to campus or your hometown? Snowfall in Salem has fluctuated greatly over the years. Average annual snowfall for the city is 6 inches but large snow storms do happen. The 1937 storm dumped over 31 inches of snow on the city as did a storm in 1950. There has also been 10 (nonconsecutive) plus years with no annual snowfall recorded.

The Willamette University Archives houses thousands of photos of campus, many of which are available online through the Campus Photo Collection. A search through the collection reveals several images of a snowy winter on campus. Here are just a few:

Eaton Hall

Eaton Hall

Waller Hall

Waller Hall in snow, 1982

Smith Auditorium

Smith Auditorium in snow, 1992

Lee House

Two students walk past Lee House

Goudy Commons

Students walk in the snow next to Goudy, 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you hope for? Whether it is to be outside enjoying winter sports or inside reading in front of a fire, best wishes for a fun holiday season!

Group of skiers.

Group of skiers.

Skier in snow.

Taking a break.

Skier on the snow.

Chilling on the snow.

Women reading by fireplace

Reading by the fireplace.


Winter Chill

feet with cozy socks, books, and cup of coffeeIt is generally true that winter is a pretty chilly time of the year in the Pacific Northwest so it is the perfect time for all of us to work on our ability to chill out! Campus life is hectic with teaching, learning, working on papers and projects, studying, participating in sports, clubs, music groups, internships and so much more. Then you add into the mix all the events going on in the world and our minds are whirling! We all need a reprieve from the hustle and bustle surrounding us and as the semester rushes to a close, maybe we should spend part of winter break in the pursuit of, well, nothing!  Or at the very least, let’s all just spend some time taking it easy, playing, goofing off, relaxing, and rejuvenating!  Winter break provides the ideal opportunity for all of us to explore the lost art of leisure. So check out one of the leisure-related books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide, fix yourself a soothing cup of tea, put your feet up, and chill!


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