Winter Snow

Winter is almost upon us. This year the winter solstice for the northern hemisphere, the astronomical first day of winter, occurs on December 21st. The solstice marks the moment when the hemisphere is tilted farthest away from the sun, and as a result, is the shortest day of the year. Will winter bring snow to campus or your hometown? Snowfall in Salem has fluctuated greatly over the years. Average annual snowfall for the city is 6 inches but large snow storms do happen. The 1937 storm dumped over 31 inches of snow on the city as did a storm in 1950. There has also been 10 (nonconsecutive) plus years with no annual snowfall recorded.

The Willamette University Archives houses thousands of photos of campus, many of which are available online through the Campus Photo Collection. A search through the collection reveals several images of a snowy winter on campus. Here are just a few:

Eaton Hall

Eaton Hall

Waller Hall

Waller Hall in snow, 1982

Smith Auditorium

Smith Auditorium in snow, 1992

Lee House

Two students walk past Lee House

Goudy Commons

Students walk in the snow next to Goudy, 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you hope for? Whether it is to be outside enjoying winter sports or inside reading in front of a fire, best wishes for a fun holiday season!

Group of skiers.

Group of skiers.

Skier in snow.

Taking a break.

Skier on the snow.

Chilling on the snow.

Women reading by fireplace

Reading by the fireplace.


Winter Chill

feet with cozy socks, books, and cup of coffeeIt is generally true that winter is a pretty chilly time of the year in the Pacific Northwest so it is the perfect time for all of us to work on our ability to chill out! Campus life is hectic with teaching, learning, working on papers and projects, studying, participating in sports, clubs, music groups, internships and so much more. Then you add into the mix all the events going on in the world and our minds are whirling! We all need a reprieve from the hustle and bustle surrounding us and as the semester rushes to a close, maybe we should spend part of winter break in the pursuit of, well, nothing!  Or at the very least, let’s all just spend some time taking it easy, playing, goofing off, relaxing, and rejuvenating!  Winter break provides the ideal opportunity for all of us to explore the lost art of leisure. So check out one of the leisure-related books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide, fix yourself a soothing cup of tea, put your feet up, and chill!


2021 MOHL Research Award

award tablet image

The Hatfield Library is pleased to announce the winners of the 2021 Mark O. Hatfield Research Award. This award is given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. The paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work. Up to two awards are given each year and winners receive $500. This year we received an abundance of wonderful papers from a variety of disciplines including anthropology, history, environmental science, religious studies, art history, biology, civic communication and media, and politics, policy, law and ethics.

The winners for 2021 are:

Lauren Burchinal for her paper “The Intersection of Sumerian Royal Inscriptions and City Laments” (Faculty sponsor–Mary Bachvarova)

Renae Wilkinson for her paper “Urban Forest Distribution in Austin, Texas” (Faculty sponsor–Joe Bowersox)

Congratulations to Lauren and Renae for their outstanding work! Also, many thanks to Joni Roberts, and the Hatfield Librarians for serving on the adjudication committee for the award.

Craig Milberg
University Librarian
Mark O. Hatfield Library
Willamette University


2019 MOHL Research Awards

award tablet imageThe Hatfield Library is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Mark O. Hatfield Research Award. This award is given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. The paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work. Up to two awards are given each year and winners receive $500. This year we received an abundance of wonderful papers from a variety of disciplines including anthropology, history, environmental science, religious studies, art history, biology, civic communication and media, and politics, policy, law and ethics.

The winners for 2019 are:

McKenna Aune–“Evaluation of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project” (Politics, Policy, Law and Ethics)

Niko Hellman–“A Construction of Dependency: White Supremacy and Anti-Miscegenation Laws” (History)

Congratulations to McKenna and Niko for their outstanding work! Also, many thanks to Gretchen Moon, Joni Roberts, and the Hatfield Librarians for serving on the adjudication committee for the award.

Craig Milberg
University Librarian
Mark O. Hatfield Library
Willamette University


Celebrating Native American Heritage Month

totem poleNovember is National Native American Heritage Month (also known as American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month) and as such, it is the perfect time to reflect on the rich and varied traditions, languages, and contributions of the indigenous peoples of North America. As of 2020, over seven million Native Americans and Native Alaskans live in the United States, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. There are over 500 federally recognized tribes, representing hundreds of different cultures. Native peoples many achievements in the areas of art, literature, music, dance, sports, cuisine, farming, and more are impressive but it is also important to recognize and acknowledge the struggles and hardships experienced by Native Americans both in the past and the present. In honor of Native American Heritage Month, check out a selection of the Hatfield Library’s recent materials by or about Native Americans (including books by Joy Harjo, the first Native American U.S. Poet Laureate) on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

For more information, see American Indian and Alaska Native Data Links: https://www.census.gov/about/partners/cic/resources/data-links/aian.html

 


Fa-boo-lous October

Tree with jack o'lanterns, owls, and batsIt’s that spooky, creepy, scary, time of the year filled with bats, black cats, ghouls, pumpkins, and all sorts of autumnal fun!  Yes, it’s time to carve jack-o’-lanterns, roast pumpkin seeds, and stock up on Halloween candy.  The weather is getting cooler and the days are getting shorter, so grab your coziest sweater, your favorite hot beverage, and settle down in your comfiest chair with a good Halloween-related read!  Have a look at a great selection of titles available from the Hatfield Library and listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

Fun fact:  According to CandyStore.com, the top Halloween candy in the U.S. is Reese’s Cups.  In Oregon, the top candy is M&M’s!


Two Libraries Working Together

By Craig Milberg, University Librarian

Everyone is aware that PNCA is now a discrete school within Willamette University (WU). What you might not realize is that as part of the merger, the greater WU gained access to a wonderful library, the PNCA Albert Solheim Library. The Mark O. Hatfield Library (MOHL) and the Solheim Library have merged administratively under an “University Libraries” structure.  Generally known as the “PNCA Library,” the Solheim Library brings terrific print collections, digital collections, and programming to the University.  Staff members from both libraries have worked diligently through the spring and summer, and the vast majority of PNCA’s collections are now discoverable and can be requested via WU’s existing library catalog.  PNCA students, faculty and staff may access the MOHL’s print collections as well. Equally exciting is that the entire WU community can access almost all of the electronic resources previously available at either institution via the existing A-Z listing of resources on our websites.

PNCA Library staff and friends.

Far more important than the merging of collections is the expertise each library gains from the other. From the MOHL perspective, the combined libraries have gained three wonderful colleagues in Portland. Sara Bystrom (Access Services Librarian), Serenity Ibsen (Director of Library Services), and Shaleigh Westphall (Reference & Instruction Librarian) all bring wonderful skills sets and experience to the combined University Libraries. Please join me in extending them a warm welcome.

Members of both libraries will continue to work diligently to combines our systems, services, and processes as the year progresses. For now, while anyone associated with any of WU’s schools is welcome to contact either library for help, we suggest that students, faculty and staff at PNCA will still find it most helpful to contact the PNCA library directly first, while Atkinson, CAS, and CST students should contact the MOHL first.  The staff of either library will direct you to the other library if we think it will be beneficial to meeting your needs.


The Call of Public Service

Mark O. Hatfield’s lengthy career of representing Oregon is the subject of the Oregon Historical Society’s traveling exhibit now on display in Hatfield Library, 2nd floor.  The Call of Public Service: The Life and Legacy of Mark O. Hatfield explores his career and highlights the issues Hatfield championed including healthcare, education, equal rights, the environment and world peace.  The exhibit is on display through November 15, 2021.

Hatfield graduated from Willamette University in 1943. After serving in the U. S. Navy during World War II, he completed a Master’s Degree in political science at Stanford University, then returned to Willamette University as an assistant professor and dean of students. Hatfield began his political career at the age of 28, when he was elected to the Oregon State House of Representatives in 1950. During his forty-six year career, he served as Oregon’s Secretary of State, Governor, and U.S. Senator.

Hatfield, pictured to the right in front of the Oregon State Capitol, donated his papers to Willamette University Archives. The collection includes materials from his time as Oregon Secretary of State and governor through retirement. The bulk of the collection relates to his time in the U. S. Senate documenting his legislative work, constituent services, communications and media, and campaign efforts. The large collection is currently being processed and will open to researchers on July 12, 2022. For more information on the collection, contact archives@willamette.edu.


New Personal Librarians Program

What are Personal Librarians?

We are launching our new Personal Librarian program this fall. Think of a Personal Librarian as a go-to person in the library. First-year and transfer students are paired up with a librarian to serve as an individual contact person in the library from day one. New students will have a name, face, and specific contact to help with any questions about the library, research, or collections.

Studies have shown (1)(2) that students do better when they have personal connections throughout their university community. The Personal Librarians will help our new students build their communities at WU, making their first experience more positive and less intimidating. It also gives librarians an additional opportunity to let students know what kinds of resources are available at the library. We provides services that students might not know to ask about, such as help with citations and even looking for resources outside of the libraries.

Personal Librarians will contact students three times during the first semester via email, and at least once during the spring semester. We hope to meet with each of our designated students individually (we might even have a special treat for them!)

For more information or how to find your Personal Librarian, visit: https://libguides.willamette.edu/personal-librarians


The Campus Novel

aerial photo of campus buildings in the fallAs we head into a new academic year, what better way to get prepared than by reading a campus novel?  A campus novel or academic novel is a genre of fiction where the main action occurs on or around a college campus or in an academic setting.  One of the earliest examples of this is The Groves of Academe by Mary McCarthy, which offers a satiric look at the faculty and administration at a small, liberal arts college.  A subgenre is the campus murder mystery such as Donna Tartt’s fascinating novel, The Secret History.  Exploring the wonderful world of college through fictional accounts written by talented novelists is a pleasure not to be missed, so grab one of the books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide, and get ready to be entertained, intrigued, annoyed, frightened and much more!


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