Autumn Fun

jack-o'-lanternsThe leaves are changing color, the sun is rising later and setting earlier, there is a slight nip in the air–fall is here!  That means it is time to uncover your coziest sweaters, discover your favorite hot beverage at the Bistro, and start thinking about pumpkins!  Or more specifically jack-o’-lanterns, because Halloween is just around the corner.  Did you know one of the earliest meanings of jack-o’lantern didn’t have anything to do with pumpkins but actually referred to a man with a lantern or a nightwatchman?  Want to know more about Halloween?  Check out the interesting selection of Halloween-related print and e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

And here’s to a “bootiful” holiday full of “spooktacular” fun (socially-distanced and safely masked, of course).


Study of Religion at Hatfield: Introducing the Claremont Collection

By Maggie Froelich, Theology Librarian mfroelich@willamette.edu

The affiliation between Willamette University and the Claremont School of Theology continues to move forward, with many CST students, faculty, and staff now located here in Salem.CST at Willamette Logo

The uniting of our two institutions means a sharing of resources, and that’s true in the library, too. Two major benefits to the WU community are a greatly expanded collection of books related to religion, philosophy, ethics, and ministry; and a dedicated Theology Librarian.

The Librarian on Lake Gennesaret, AKA the Sea of Galilee

The Librarian on Lake Gennesaret, AKA the Sea of Galilee

First, let me introduce myself. This summer I joined the library’s Public Services team as the Theology Librarian. I have a PhD in New Testament and Christian Origins, earned at CST. In my academic research I like to read our earliest Christian sources through historical Greco-Roman perspectives. My dissertation analyzed the Gospel of Mark as a response to war and defeat, and lately I’ve been getting really into the ways that the earliest Greek and Roman adherents to Jesus worship might have understood their new devotions. My latest article, “Sacrificed Meat in Corinth and Jesus Worship as a Cult among Cults,” is forthcoming from the Journal of Early Christian History

As a member of the library’s Public Services Division, I officially serve as the liaison librarian to the CST community and will soon begin serving the Religious Studies department, as well. No matter what department you’re in, if you’re interested in ancient Mediterranean history, classical literature, European and Near Eastern polytheism, the Bible, ancient Greek language, any aspect of religious studies, or Netflix’sThe Witcher, I want to talk to you.

But what about the books? As part of CST’s move to Salem, 50,000 volumes from the CST library collection came up here to Hatfield. That collection includes reference works, works by current and past CST faculty, works in Korean, and the collection of the Center for Process Studies, a Claremont faculty institute dedicated to process philosophy and theology. The CST library was southern California’s premier theology library, and the most important books from its collection are now at Willamette, where students, scholars, and ministers can research academic and professional topics in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and more. You can find the Claremont collection on the first floor of the Hatfield library.

I’ll continue to post here in coming months, highlighting some of the distinctive and interesting features of the Claremont collection, and a great place to start is the reference section. Here are some of the unique reference materials now available to the entire Willamette community:

  • The 20-volume Encyclopedia of Buddhist Arts contains entries and photographs for important artists, architecture, paintings, sculpture, calligraphy, and styles from all over the Buddhist world.
  • Two editions of the Babylonian Talmud, an 18-volume English translation and a 41-volume Hebrew edition, are invaluable additions to our Jewish studies materials.
  • The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Law discusses topics from the early development of Torah to American Supreme Court cases, providing students a foothold in both biblical jurisprudence and issues of religion and state throughout history and across the globe.
  • The second edition of the Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism spans the history of apocalyptic movements from the Hellenistic period to the modern day, covering apocalypticism in Judaism and Christianity, art, and pop culture.

Faculty Colloquium: Melissa Marks

Please join us on Thursday, October 8, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/93049348010

for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: Functional Annotation of TonB Dependent Receptors Involved in Stress Resistance – Results and Reflections from a Cross-Institutional Collaboration

Presenter: Melissa Marks, Associate Professor of Biology

Melissa Marks

Abstract:  Vitamins and minerals are critical for proper functioning of all living organisms. Maintaining the proper balance of minerals, or metal ions, is critical for resistance to stress caused by normal metabolic processes. In Gram negative bacteria, metal transport across the outer membrane is often facilitated by members of a diverse and poorly understood family of surface proteins known as TonB-Dependent Receptors/Transporters (TBDRs). In the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that several predicted, but uncharacterized, TBDRs are important for metal ion homeostasis. In collaboration Lisa Bowers, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Biology, St. Olaf College) and our students, we are in the process of functionally annotating this group of TBDRs by characterizing their substrates, physiological roles, and genetic regulation. In this presentation, I will provide a big picture overview of our scientific endeavors. I’ll also share my reflections on establishing a new cross-institution collaboration and some of the unexpected benefits of doing collaborative science in an undergraduate research environment.

Bill Kelm and Kathryn Nyman
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Rosa León Zayas

Please join us on Thursday, October 1, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/j/95698064708

for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: Going Deeper: Microbial Diversity and Metabolic Potential in the Marine Deep Biosphere

Presenter: Rosa León Zayas, Assistant Professor of Biology

Rosa Zayas

Abstract:  Exploration of the deep ocean has expanded our understanding of oceanic ecosystems, including continental margins and mid-ocean ridges, and yet still little is known about these deep sites on Earth. Some of the most poorly understood ecosystems are subsurface environments, particularly as it pertains to the distribution of archaea and their associated metabolic abilities. In this presentation, I will share an overview of some of the work I conducted during my junior research leave, which includes the discussion of a recently published analysis of the archaeal community structure and their potential ecological roles, and preliminary results on our most recently NSF funded work on PET Plastic degrading bacteria. Overall, this research seeks to reveal the metabolic potential of novel archaeal lineages, which significantly contributes to our overall understanding of the ecosystem function of subsurface sedimentary environments.Additionally, by studying the metabolic capacity of microorganisms that degrade PET Plastic, we can better understand their mechanisms for degrading one of the largest sources of pollutants, single use plastics, with the ultimate goal of building upon that potential to generate a more efficient degradation process in order to eventually assist with the reduction of this man made environmental pollutant.

Bill Kelm and Kathryn Nyman
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

Image of Frida KahloNational Hispanic Heritage Month originally began as Hispanic Heritage Week back in 1968 when President Lyndon B. Johnson issued an official proclamation designating the week.  In 1989, President George W. Bush issued the first proclamation to change the week celebration to a month celebration and thus National Hispanic Heritage Month was born.  It begins September 15, the anniversary of independence of several Latin American countries, and runs through October 15.  This annual celebration gives us a chance to pay tribute to the many ways the Hispanic and Latinx communities have positively influenced and enriched our nation.

As President Barack Obama stated so eloquently in his 2015 proclamation, “During National Hispanic Heritage Month, let us renew our commitment to honoring the invaluable ways Hispanics contribute to our common goals, to celebrating Hispanic culture, and to working toward a stronger, more inclusive, and more prosperous society for all.”

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, check out the diverse selection of print and e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

Visit the following websites for more information:

https://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/hispanic-heritage-month.htm

https://www.archives.gov/news/topics/hispanic-heritage-month

 


Fall Update

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library (MOHL). We are thrilled to welcome all Bearcats, new and returning, as well as students and colleagues from CST. For some of you this update will reflect some changes to the way you are used to us doing things and for others it will be an introduction to us. For comprehensive information about the building, services, collections and policies please visit our website at http://library@willamette.edu.

Building:

The maximum occupancy of the MOHL is 100 people until further notice. Access to the building is restricted to current students, staff and faculty of Willamette University and Claremont School of Theology. Bring your ID card as a card swipe is required for access. Given campus rules and occupancy restrictions we can not welcome guests, children, spouses, etc. Circulation Desk

Fall hours reflect our attempts to balance student academic needs against employee and student health concerns. Hours may be adjusted as the campus and community health situation change.

August 17th to August 21st, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Regular hours (including the Fishbowl) starting on August 24th:

Monday to Thursday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Archives hours are by appointment only.

• Group and individual study rooms will be closed until further notice.

• Masks are required and seating has been arranged and marked so as to encourage social distancing of at least 6 feet.

• Closed container beverages are permitted but eating is prohibited until further notice. Water fountains have been shut off until further notice.

Circulation:

• Desk hours are the same as for the library.

• Please note that for the duration of the COVID-19 crisis, physical reserves have been suspended.

• Summit and ILL are active, but many higher education institutions are not yet participating.

• All items removed from the shelves, returned, or ordered vial ILL or Summit will be quarantined for 72 hours before being available. Please take account of this delay and plan accordingly.

• Contactless check out will remain available for those that request it in the front vestibule. You may access the vestibule with your valid ID 24 hours/day.

Reference and Instruction:

The majority of reference and instruction interactions will be virtual in the fall. We will use chat and Zoom for most of these interactions. Don’t worry if you don’t have a device with Zoom with you, we have workstations set up in the library you can use.

More details can be found on the library’s website. https://library.willamette.edu/

Collection Update:

Just a reminder that over the summer the majority of the bound periodicals moved to offsite storage. You can request articles using our ILL infrastructure.

The collection of monographs and thesis we received from CST arrived over the summer, are shelved as their own collection on the first floor of the library, and are available for browsing and borrowing. They may be found via our online catalog.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us at library@willamette.edu or 503-370-6018 with any questions.


The Joy of Art

Paint tubes and paint brushes with paint on themThere is a lot going on in the world right now and many of us are feeling anxious or stressed. Finding methods to help us cope with the uncertainties in our lives is important; one valuable resource to remember is art. Whether you enjoy making art or you love looking at art, art can make a difference. Art has a way of lifting us up, providing much needed distraction, offering moments of joy, inspiring us, and helping us through times of crisis. There is increasing evidence that “art enhances brain function and well-being,” which seems like a positive outcome for all. August is a great time to stop and reflect on the wonder of art in our lives because it is American Artist Appreciation Month! Lots of museums from around the globe are offering virtual tours of their collections that you can enjoy from the comfort of home. Willamette’s very own Hallie Ford Museum offers a great variety of art from all over the world but with a particular emphasis on Northwest art and the Hatfield Library has its own special tie to American artists with the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive. In celebration of American artists, check out the diverse selection of print and e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 


The Right of Peaceful Protest

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” The Boston Tea Party, Civil Rights protests, Women’s Right to Vote marches, Black Lives Matter protests, Iraq War protests, Vietnam War protests, Occupy protests, LGBTQ rights marches, Dakota Access Pipeline protests, March for Our Lives, March for Science—these are just some of the many examples of people exercising their first amendment rights through protest.  For generations, people have been using protests as a way to make their voices heard, call attention to an issue, influence government policy, and change the world.  Millions of people have protested and marched in an effort to fight against injustices and enact social change.  In the thick of these protests, it is sometimes hard to see what they accomplish but in the long term, protests have often succeeded in bringing about important change and even altering the course of history.  In celebration of our right to assembly, check out the diverse selection of protest-related e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 

Let us remember, we are all part of one American family.  We are united in common values, and that includes belief in equality under the law, basic respect for public order, and the right of peaceful protest. – Barack Obama


Digital Collections for Remote Research

By Stepanie Milne-Lane, Processing Archivist and Records Manager smilnelane@willamette.edu

Since the ongoing public health crisis forced the Hatfield Library to transition its services in March, the Willamette University (WU) Archives & Special Collections has missed the students, staff, faculty, and community members that frequently walked through our door.

We know that remote research comes with challenges — Not everything is digitized and there is something satisfying about opening a box and systematically going through archival folders. Over the years, the WU Archives & Special Collections has made steady progress in creating digital collections. Each of our four collecting areas boasts digital collections that are ripe for research.

Parsons Sketch

Eunice Parsons, “Sketchbook 1, Image 5,” Willamette University Archives

The WU University Archives & Records has numerous digitized collections that are keyword searchable and hold the key to WU’s history. Popular digitized collections include The Wallulah, 1903-2006 (student yearbook), The Collegian, 1875-2020 (student newspaper), WU Student Handbooks, 1892-2020, and Catalogs and Bulletins, 1860-2007. Also available are materials relating to Freshman Glee, one of Willamette’s longest running – and most beloved – traditions.

A collaborative project of the WU Archives & Special Collections and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive (PNAA) is a collection of materials related to the careers of artists who are or were active in Oregon and Washington. Digitized PNAA collections include an Eunice Parsons online exhibit that explores and considers the development of Parsons’ more popular style through the lens of her personal sketchbooks.

People exercising in an empty Sparks Pool.

Exercise Class in Sparks Pool, Undated, Campus Photograph Collection.

WU’s extensive Political Papers contain photographs, memorabilia and audiovisual materials of elected individuals representing Oregon at the state and national level. The digitized Norma Paulus Scrapbooks offers a glimpse into Paulus’s campaigns and legislative work.

Rounding our holdings are the Personal Papers, which include manuscript collections, diaries, and the correspondence with a focus on individuals involved in regional missionary work, settling Salem, and developing Willamette University. The digitized Suffrage Era Scrapbook is worth exploring, as it contains poetry, comedic articles and satire, cartoons, articles about women’s suffrage — which celebrates its 100th anniversary in August — and news bulletins about the 1918 Influenza pandemic.

Hatfield Library in 1986

Hatfield Library in 1986

Although our door hasn’t opened and closed as frequently over the past four months, the Archives is anything but quiet. Susan Irwin joined the Hatfield Library team and is spearheading the processing of Senator Mark O. Hatfield’s papers. Staff also completed processing associated with the NHPRC and LSTA grants. We can’t wait to see you, but in the meantime, we hope that our digital collections might come in useful. We are always here to assist with any and all questions you might have. We look forward to having you walk through our door again in the future!


Celebrating the Great Outdoors

June is National Great Outdoors Month and never before has getting outdoors been so important.  As we all struggle to cope with this new world of COVID-19, spending time in nature can bring joy and solace.  Striding along a path, feeling the sun on your back, watching a squirrel scamper up a tree, enjoying the beauty of a brightly-colored flower, listening to the birds singing—it’s magical!  According to the experts, being outside is one of the safest places for us to be right now as long as we remain six feet away from others.  And staying away from others is a lot easier to do outdoors! Those of us living in the Northwest are lucky to live in a temperate climate with easy access to beautiful places in every direction.  Most cities have wonderful parks and trails but just walking around your neighborhood can reveal the natural beauty all around us.  So get outside and join us in celebrating the great outdoors!  In preparation for your time in nature, check out the nature-related e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 

In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks–John Muir


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