Celebrating Short Stories

How many of us remember our discomfort and increasing anxiety when reading Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Tell Tale Heart” or “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson?  What about those monkeys in “Interpreter of Maladies” by Jhumpa Lahiri?  Short stories have the power to thrill, horrify, tantalize, and enchant us.  They show us beauty, make us examine uncomfortable subjects, and stick with us long after the last word of the story has been read.

 

Encouraged by the success of April’s National Poetry Month, May has been declared International Short Story Month.  Everyone is encouraged to read and share short stories throughout the month.  You can even participate in the “A Story a Day” challenge in which writers write and finish a short story every day in May.

 

Join us in celebrating Short Story Month by reading a short story today!  Looking for short story suggestions?  Check out the books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.


National Poetry Month

The Academy of American Poets founded National Poetry Month in April 1996 to celebrate “poetry’s vital place in our culture.”  One of the primary goals of the month is to “highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets.” Over the years, Poetry Month has become a huge literary observance with readers, students, teachers, librarians, booksellers, publishers, and poets from around the world participating in this month-long celebration in a whole host of different ways.  Many special events and readings are scheduled to occur during April in honor of poetry. Over 100,000 National Poetry Month posters are distributed to schools, libraries, and bookstores each year.  On April 18, poetry lovers are encouraged to participate in “Poem in Your Pocket Day.” On this day, select a poem, carry it with you, and share it with others wherever you go!

To find out more about National Poetry Month, check out poets.org.  And go to the WU Reads Reading Guide for an interesting selection of recent books of poetry available in our collection.


Salute to Social Workers

Every day across the United States, hundreds of thousands of social workers work to support, protect and empower millions of people as they struggle to deal with and solve problems in their day-to-day lives.  According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the job outlook for social workers is growing rapidly and “is projected to grow 16% from 2016-2026, which is much faster than the average for all occupations.” Sadly, the important work of social workers is often underappreciated and frequently underpaid.  The month of March has been set aside to pay tribute to all the dedicated social workers out there and to acknowledge their important contributions to society.  “Elevate” is the theme for this year’s National Social Work Month and this theme was chosen in an effort to call attention to social workers endeavors to elevate people and also to point out the need to elevate the pay of social workers.  To find out more about the social work profession, check out the National Association of Social Workers website.  And go to the WU Reads Reading Guide for some interesting books on social work and social service.


Oregon: The Early Years

One hundred and sixty years ago, on February 14, 1859, Oregon was officially admitted to the union as the 33rd state.  In the grand scheme of things, that really isn’t that long ago but the years leading up to and shortly after becoming a state are jammed pack with interesting stories.  Long before traders, explorers and pioneers began showing up in the state, many indigenous tribes called this area home.  The history of Oregon and the stories of the Native Americans and the settlers who ventured here along the Oregon Trail make fascinating topics for exploration.  In tribute to Oregon’s statehood, it seems appropriate for us to learn more about the native peoples of this land and the early Westerners that settled the Oregon Territory and eventually created this state.  To start you out on this exploration, check out the WU Reads Reading Guide for some interesting books on early Oregon history.


Wonderful World of Winter

Winter is coming and we’re not talking about The Game of Thrones.  No, we’re talking about the time of year when the days are shorter, the nights are longer, and the weather is cooler.  In Salem, it’s a time of blustery days, soaking rains, and perhaps even the occasional snow storm.  This time of year can be a wonderful time to head for the coast to watch wild waves while avoiding the summer crowds.  If you don’t mind the rain, hikes at Silver Creek Falls can be rewarding–the falls are impressive with all the rain and the crowds are greatly diminished.  Or head to the mountain for snow fun of all kinds.  It is also prime time for wearing cozy sweaters, sitting by the fire, drinking cocoa, and–you guessed it–reading a good book!  If you need some good winter-themed reading material, check out our WU Reads Reading Guide.


Writers of the World, Unite!

November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)—the goal is to actually write an entire novel in one month! National Novel Writing Month is also a nonprofit organization that “…believes in the transformational power of creativity. We provide the structure, community, and encouragement to help people find their voices, achieve creative goals, and build new worlds—on and off the page.”  Thousands of writers across the nation and the world get together in libraries, bookstores, community centers and/or virtually to support one another’s writing.  Hundreds of novels written during NaNoWriMo have been traditionally published such as Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus, and Hugh Howey’s Wool. In honor of all the novel writers out there, we offer you a short list of novels about novelists for your reading pleasure! Check out our WU Reads Reading Guide.


The Beauty of Book Groups

The weather is getting cooler, which means it is the perfect time of the year to curl up with a good book!  And when you’ve finished reading the book, why not have a great discussion about it with your book group?  National Reading Group Month is an initiative of the Women’s National Book Association (WNBA) and is celebrated each year in October.  According to the WNBA, “Reading groups are proving that good books bring people together. National Reading Group Month salutes reading groups. It fosters their growth and promotes the love of literature.”  So how about starting or joining a book group?  You can find information about local book groups at public libraries or bookstores such as the Salem Public Library or the Book Bin.  And join us in celebrating National Reading Group Month by checking out one of the titles related to book groups listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.


Ode to Wilderness

There’s nothing quite like a walk on the beach, the view from a mountain top, the sound of a waterfall, the sight of a creature in the wild…  For many of us, spending time surrounded by nature is inspirational, restorative, and almost a necessity for our mental and spiritual health.  Our deep connection to nature comes with an obligation to safeguard it for the future.  President Obama said it best:

It is one of our greatest responsibilities as citizens of this Nation and stewards of this planet to protect these outdoor spaces of incomparable beauty and to ensure that this powerful inheritance is passed on to future generations.

The library is pleased to celebrate National Wilderness Month; September is a particularly beautiful time in the Northwest, so pack a lunch, put on your boots, and take a hike!  And don’t forget to take one of the wilderness-related books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide to enjoy on your lunch break!


A Tribute to Water

August is the time of year when many of us take a vacation and find ourselves heading towards a body of water.  We go wading, swimming, boating, and fishing. We walk along the shoreline, relish the beauty of the river, lake or sea, and contemplate our place in the world. Water has been an inspiration to artists and writers for centuries. About 60% percent of our body is made up of water. It is an essential element for all life and yet we often take it for granted. Clean water is crucial for everyone and yet millions of people around the world live without access to safe drinking water. In light of all this, we are taking the opportunity this month to acknowledge the importance of water…check out an assortment of water-related books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.


Here Comes the Sun

July in the Pacific Northwest is typically a glorious month of long days and wonderful weather.  This month we celebrate the primary contributor to this golden period in time…the sun!  Now is the ideal time to sit on your porch, hang out at a local park, or lounge at the beach with a good book.  It is the perfect way to stimulate your mind and soak up some vitamin D all at the same time.  So head to the library, bookstore, or your very own bookshelf, grab up a book and head to your favorite outdoor spot.  Need a little inspiration?  Check out an assortment of sun-related books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.