Brightly Dawning Day

You are invited to a staged reading of the latest iteration of Brightly Dawning Day, a play originally devised by the faculty and students of the department of Theatre, in consultation with Professor Chasar and his students, during the 2012-2013 season.

The play celebrates the life of Abigail Scott Duniway and her fight to gain Oregon women the right to vote. The play is equal parts performance piece, pop-culture mashup, and history play, and is a lot of fun!  The reading will run approximately 60 minutes, and will be followed by a script development talkback.

This will be in the Hatfield Room and will start at 7 pm THIS WEDNESDAY, 10/25.

Additional details and photos are available at:

Literary Reading with Mike Scalise

Please join us for the second event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Mike Scalise.  The reading will take place on Tuesday, October 24th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Scalise’s memoir, The Brand New Catastrophe, was the recipient of the Center for Fiction’s 2014 Christopher Doheny Award.  Scalise’s story begins when a ruptured pituitary tumor leaves him with the hormone disorder acromegaly at age 24, and he must navigate a new, alien world of illness maintenance. His mother, who has a chronic heart condition and a flair for drama, serves as a complicated model. Ultimately, it is a moving, funny exploration of how we define ourselves by the stories we choose to tell.

Mike Scalise’s work has appeared in the New York TimesWall Street Journal, Agni, Indiewire, Ninth Letter, Paris Review Daily, and other places.  He is an 826DC advisory board member, has received fellowships and scholarships from Bread Loaf, Yaddo, and the Ucross Foundation, and was the Philip Roth Writer in Residence at Bucknell University.

PRAISE FOR THE BRAND NEW CATASTROPHE:

“His way is with humor, optimism, courage and probing introspection, the very characteristics—combined with crisp prose and a rare and innately interesting medical condition—that make this a winning literary debut.” —The New York Times Book Review

“An offbeat, witty memoir. . . Scalise is unsparing in recounting his reaction to his diagnosis while keeping the reader engaged in a story about catastrophe. . . Sensitive and well-written.”
Publishers Weekly

“In his memoir The Brand New Catastrophe, Mike Scalise meditates with crackling wit and self-awareness on chronic illness, family, and the clichés of catastrophe stories.”—Kenyon Review

“The effects of illness on self-image and its gravitational pull on family, friends, and spouse are touchingly detailed in this upbeat health memoir.” Booklist review

“Despite the seriousness of the subject, The Brand New Catastrophe manages to be as funny as it is smart about mortality, the fragility of our bodies, and understanding the worst things that happen to us.”—Buzzfeed Books

“The Brand New Catastrophe reveals the human experience of acromegaly with a beautiful and skillful clarity, rendering the rare and misunderstood disorder with an intimate, personal grace.” —Literary Hub

Image source: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6873239.Mike_Scalise

 


Eunice Parsons Papers

Eunice Parsons was born in 1916 in Loma, Colorado but spent most of her young life in Chicago. When she was a young girl, she attended children’s classes at the University of Chicago where she learned an appreciation for art, as well as the skills that would allow her to pursue a career in the field later in life. After graduating high school, Parsons attended a few art classes from the University of Chicago. Soon after, Parsons married and moved to Portland along with her new husband. She spent the next two decades as a working mother. In the 1940s she began taking classes at the Portland Museum Art School. Shortly after, in 1957, she took a trip to New York to acquaint and immerse herself in the culture of art. Parsons took a sketchbook where she made exhaustive notes and depicted many landscapes. This notebook showcases her earliest inclinations in playing with color, line, and shading, all developing into a unique and distinctive style. After returning from New York, Parsons continued her career as an artist and eventually began teaching at the Portland Museum Art School. While teaching, she became notorious as a blunt but brilliant instructor and would lead numerous student trips to Europe and the birthplaces of western art. In 2006 Parsons, along with others, was instrumental in opening the 12×16 Gallery in Portland. In 2017 she continues to be an influential and prolific artist at the age of 100.

The Eunice Parsons papers encompass not only Eunice Parsons’ long and influential career as a Portland artist, but also the inner workings of the Portland art community from the early 1950s through to the present day. It contains Parsons’ manuscripts from her endeavors as an author, fliers from a variety of Portland artists, photographs and slides from her teaching career, samples of her art and sketchbooks, professional papers, and a great wealth of correspondence in the form of Christmas cards from many of the most famous Portland artists.

For additional information about this collection, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/5012

Also, view the online exhibit of a few selected sketch books: exhibit by the same intern who processed her collection:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/archives/omeka/exhibits/show/matriarchofmodernism/introduction

Note: The Eunice Parsons papers were processed and the exhibition created by McKelvey Mandigo-Stoba, Willamette University ’17. A special thank you to Sybil Westenhouse for investing in experiential learning through the Sybil Westenhouse Archives Excellence Fund.


Zotero – Citation Tool

This past year, the Hatfield Library replaced RefWorks with Zotero. This is the first semester that we have been actively teaching the Willamette community how to install and use Zotero.

Zotero is a free citation tool that helps you cite, manage, and share your literature research. You can install a browser extension (available for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Explorer–it sometimes has problems with Safari) and work entirely with the online version of Zotero.  You can also download the desktop version which embeds itself within MS Word and works with the browser extension (we suggest downloading both desktop and browser extension).   You can also drag and drop citations into Google Docs from the desktop Zotero.

It work with both Macs, PCs, and Linux. While there is a little learning curve, it is fairly easy to catch on. Zotero is a powerful and handy tool for any academic researcher, and will serve you well in you academic and professional career.

For additional information, such as installation instructions and a video tutorial, visit http://libguides.willamette.edu/zotero.

For questions about Zotero or to setup an appointment to learn more, contact Bill Kelm (bkelm@willamette.edu) or John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu)

 


Betty LaDuke Conversation

You’re invited! Join us for a panel discussion exploring the roles art and activism play in raising awareness, creating social change, and advocating for justice.

Talk Title:  Social Justice Through Art, Advocacy, and Activism: A Conversation with Artist Betty LaDuke and Guests

Topics discussed will include human rights, sustainability, and immigration within a local, national and international context, with a focus on current events such as Standing Rock and DACA. Internationally recognized artist and activist Betty LaDuke will present an artist’s talk followed by a panel discussion. Joining LaDuke for the discussion is Native hip hop artist Scott Kalama (Warm Springs) aka Blue Flamez, and Willamette University student and President of Willamette’s Native and Indigenous Student Union Alexus Uentillie (Diné) ’19.  Also offered in conjunction with the panel discussion are the exhibits on display in Goudy Commons, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, Rogers Music Hall, and third floor of the University Center (Putnam).

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Location: Ford Hall – Theatre

Audience: Free and open to the public. General Seating.

Sponsors:  Willamette University Green Grant Fund, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, and University Archives and Special Collections.

Questions: Contact Mary McRobinson (mmcrobin@willamette.edu, 503-370-6764) and Jonathan Bucci (jbucci@willamette.edu, 503-370-6861).

 


Alumni Weekend

Alumni Weekend is September 15-17, 2017.  There are a number of planned activities for our beloved alumni, visitors, and current students that are listed online (view schedule), including reunions, panel discussions, social mixers, campus tours, excursions around Salem, celebratory meals, exciting entertainment and awards ceremonies.  Alumni Weekend truly has something for everyone.

More than 800 total guests and 500 Bearcats returned to campus this past September, making it one of the most successful and highest attended Alumni Weekend gatherings in school history.  Get a glimpse of the fun that was had by checking out the Alumni Weekend 2016 Recap and Photo Galley.  Also, a number of items owned by Willamette alumni will be on display this weekend on the 5th floor of Waller Hall for alumni weekend.  They will be on display into October for the Waller Hall birthday celebration.  These items include unique items from the Archives that usually are not loaned.

Below are a photos from last year’s Alumni Weekend (2016), including a leather bag with an early Willamette University bearcat emblem owned by Marian Pope (class of 1936), and a yellow stadium seat cushion with Barney the Beartcat that was used between 1952 through the 1970s.

(Info and photos courtesy of the Archives & Special Collections and the Alumni Weekend web page.)


Betty LaDuke Paintings

As you enter the Hatfield Library or walk through the Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center or Goudy Commons, you may notice new paintings on display.  These paintings are part of the collaborative exhibition, Betty LaDuke: Social Justice Revisited, presented by the Willamette University Archives and Special Collections and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

“Oregon artist and writer Betty LaDuke has gained an international reputation for her murals, paintings, and sketches. Her work tends to express socialist progress and life’s continuity, from images of America’s civil rights struggles, such as Play Free (1968), to women’s struggles for survival in war-ridden, spoiled lands, such as Eritrea/Ethiopia: Where Have All the Fathers Gone (1998).” – The Oregon Encyclopedia

The paintings will be on display throughout the fall semester.  The Archives holds LaDuke’s papers as a collection within the Pacific Northwest Artists Archives. The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Willamette University’s Green Fund provided through the Office of Sustainability. The four paintings below are on display in the Hatfield Library throughout the fall semester.

Additional information about Betty LaDuke, including events, books, videos, and websites can be found at:
http://libguides.willamette.edu/betty_laduke

 

  Eritrea:
Dreaming Home
2002
Eritrea:
Refugees Waiting
2002
Kosovo:
War Widows
2006
Mozambique:
Vanishing Rainforests
2009

Eclipse-2017

“The Great American Eclipse,” the first solar eclipse to touch the continental United States since 1979, occurred right here in Salem on the morning of August 21st (10:18 a.m.).  We have compiled events that happened on campus, as well as observation tips, safety, and other fun activities.

Additional info at: http://libguides.willamette.edu/solar-eclipse


Oregon Coast and Highway History

The Oregon Coast is filled with unexpected history. Prior to World War I, most of the Oregon coast was inaccessible. As a response to World War I and perceived need for emergency preparedness, the concept of the Roosevelt Coast Military Highway was created and named in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1919, Oregon voters approved the sale of $2.5 million in bonds for the project, but matching federal funds failed to materialize. But Oregonians still wanted access to the coasts, so the Oregon’s Highway Department began work on 400 miles worth of road, bridges, and tunnels in 1921 and continued through the 1920s & 30s. The road became U.S. 101 in 1926 and then renamed in 1931 as the Oregon Coast Highway.

This is also the 50th anniversary of Oregon’s Beach Bill which was signed into law on July 6, 1967 to safeguard beaches from development.  Our beloved coast could look much different had the bill failed and a few private developers won. Thankfully as Oregonians began to hear what they stood to lose, the trickle of public support turned into a tidal wave.  After months of  battle, the bill was signed into law.  And the rest is history.  Your experience of our wonderful Oregon Coast line and access to the miles of beach that people around the world come to visit is a direct result from this important legislative bill.  Know that our beautiful beach is for the public to treasure and protect.  Forever!

Below are just a few of the dozens of images from the Oregon Encyclopedia that describe the history of Highway 101, the Oregon Coast Highway (https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/highway_101_oregon_coast_highway_/#.WWOvVojyuUk).  The following link also goes to a page of activities and events connected to the Oregon’s Beach Bill (http://visittheoregoncoast.com/oregon-beach-bill-50th-anniversary-celebration).