Reading by Emily Johnston

Please join us for a reading and discussion with Emily Johnston, poet, essayist, and activist.

Thursday, February 1st at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Johnston’s writing explores the beauty of the natural world, grief at its destruction by human action and inaction, and our obligations to the future. She is the author of the poetry volume Her Animals, as well as essays in Truthout, The Guardian, and elsewhere. She is one of the five Valve Turners who in 2016 shut down tar sands oil pipelines entering the US. Facing felony charges for their actions, she and two co-defendants have been granted the opportunity to argue in court that their actions were necessary.

All are welcome. We hope to see you there.

Frann Michel
Professor of English
Co-chair, Film Studies


“HTTPS” New Standard Explained

In case you have bookmarked websites, you may begin to noticed that more of these links are broken.  Why the sudden uptick in broken links?  The culprit is probably not a new URL or a negligent systems administrator.  Rather it is most likely due to the new standard of Hypertext Transfer Protocol, or what most users recognize as the “HTTP” beginning of most URLs.

The new standard has added an “S” to “HTTP,” so you will see more and more web sites using “HTTPS” to begin their URL.  In case you are curious, the “S” stands for “Secure.” You might ask what makes this new standard more secure?

To answer this question, it helps to understand how information is sent through the standard HTTP.  Data is sent over the Internet in small packets of information that are not typically encrypted.  The data is sent from your computer browser to a website server and back in fractions of a second.  The new standard has added a layer of security through an encrypted security layer known as a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and/or Transport Layer Security (TLS).

Normally, sending info packets through a SSL or TLS slows down the process of distributing information.  However, websites can speed up the process by adding SSL or TLS certificates in their code libraries where the encoding and decoding of website info takes place.  Web browsers such as Chrome, Safari, Edge, and FireFox automatically seek our the certificates and will have some indication of site security such as a lock.  Depending on the browser, web sites that don’t have SSL or TLS certificates will often have an “I” before the URL to let users view the web site’s information before visiting the site.  Often  sites Below are a few sample URLs.

If the page or site uses HTTPS, some SSL or TLS parameters are exchanged between your browser and the site’s server, and a secure connection is opened for information to be encrypted and transferred.  Web sites that use a SSL or TLS pass through their web site information through an extra layer of security and meet a higher standard of security.  This is important when sensitive information such as financial or health or personal info is transferred over the internet, but a good chunk of web sites do not necessarily need this additional layer of security.

The main take away is when you encounter these more secure sites, it may take longer to interact with them, but it is for a good cause.  Your personal information is running through additional security.  And if you can’t find your bookmarked links it might be because the site is using the new “HTTPS” standard.

For more information about this, visit: https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Secure%20Hypertext%20Transfer%20Protocol


2017 Read Posters

We recently received our latest batch of WU READ posters.  This year the Willamette faculty and staff feature: Cindy Koenig Richards, Associate Professor of Civic Communications & Media; Mat Barreiro, Director of Academic Support; Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French & Francophone Studies; Joe Bowersox III, Professor of Environmental & Earth Sciences; and Laura Taylor, Associate Professor of Economics.  Their selection of books (in no particular order) include Should Trees Have Standing, Liar’s Poker, Flowers of Evil, Citizen: an American Lyric, and Ebony & Ivy.

To see larger scale images of these posters and past posters visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/wu-reads-posters

 


Protecting Pandas Lecture: Elena Songster

Please mark your calendars for an engaging and informative lecture on “pandas” Monday, February 5 at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Professor E. Elena Songster of St. Mary’s College of California will share her research on the establishment of the panda preserves in western China and the concurrent development of a conservation ethos in the People’s Republic of China in a talk titled, “Protecting Pandas and the Evolution of Environmental Science and Stewardship in the P.R.C.” The lecture is free and open to the public — please encourage your students to attend!

Note: content and photo from campus-wide email.


Black History Month

This month we have a selection of books and movies on display on the first floor of the library that celebrate Black History Month.  Black History Month began as a way to remember important people and events of African diaspora, and was initially proposed by black educators and students at Kent State University in February of 1969.

When President Gerald Ford recognized Black History Month during the celebration of the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976, recognition of it took hold across the country, particularly in educational institutions.  It now incorporates important people and events of the American Civil Rights Movement as well, such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the Selma to Montgomery marches.  So come “check out” our selection of books and videos at our Black History Month display!


2017 Tree of Giving Wrap up

Update on the Tree of Giving Book Drive

Thank you so much for participating in this year’s Tree of Giving Book Drive.  We have officially wrapped up for this year, and Four Corners Elementary was the beneficiary this year.  Together we collected 181 books (including five Spanish-language books), 28 gloves, 15 hats, and 4 scarfs.  We also want to thank all of our drop off locations: The Willamette Store who also provided a 30% discount on books purchased for the Tree of Giving, the Bistro, Law Library, and Sparks Athletic Center.

Additional info is available at: https://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving. For questions about this event, please contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu) or Michael Smith (msmith@willamette.edu).

Below are a few photos of the book donations given to Four Corners Elementary School.  Thank you again for all of your wonderful support!


Tree of Giving 2017

This year’s Tree of Giving Book Drive will benefit Four Corners Elementary.

We are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to library of Four Corners Elementary School. We also encourage clothing donations such as hats, gloves and scarves for students at Four Corners.

Some ideas for book donate (both Spanish & English) are Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Pokemon, Amulet, Dork Diaries, Weird But True, and books about Legos to name a few.  Additional details about this program are available at:

https://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving.

The last day to donate is Friday, December 15. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Law Library, Bistro, Sparks Athletic Center, and Pi Beta Phi.

If you have any questions, please contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu) or Michael Smith (msmith@willamette.edu). Below is the poster used on our social media sites.

Thank you for your support!

 


Schatz and Stahl Book Talk

Dear colleagues,

Please join us in the Hatfield Room at 4:30 on Wednesday 11/29 as Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl share their bestselling children’s books, Rad American Women A to Z and Rad Women Worldwide, and discuss “how to be rad in difficult times.” This event is free and open to the public, and it’s family friendly. We’ll have coffee and cookies, and the Willamette store will have books available for purchase. A book signing will follow the discussion.

This event is sponsored by Civic Communication and Media department, with significant support from Willamette’s Mellon-funded Learning By Creating initiative.

During their Willamette visit, Schatz and Klein Stahl will also lead a half-day workshop for students in CCM/AES/WGS 342, my course on U.S. Women’s Activism Since 1920. The workshop will support students’ collaborative project: a collection of visual portraits, biographies, and critical essays designed to enrich public understanding of women’s contributions to American life.  In addition, students will interview Schatz and Klein Stahl for the KMUZ radio show Worldviews Wednesdays, as part of the La Chispa project led by Professor Catalina de Onís.

About the speakers:

Kate Schatz is the New York Times-bestselling author of Rad American Women A-Z and Rad Women Worldwide. She’s a writer, editor, and educator, who’s been passionate about both writing and politics since she was a kid. She’s a co-founder of Solidarity Sundays, a nationwide network of feminist activist groups, and she lives with her family on the island of Alameda.

Miriam Klein Stahl is a Bay Area artist, educator and activist. In addition to her work in printmaking, drawing, sculpture, paper-cut and public art, she is also the co-founder of the Arts and Humanities Academy at Berkeley High School where she’s taught since 1995. As an artist, she follows in a tradition of making socially relevant work, creating portraits of political activists, misfits, radicals and radical movements. As an educator, she has dedicated her teaching practice to address equity through the lens of the arts. Her work has been widely exhibited and reproduced internationally. She lives in Berkeley, California with her wife, artist Lena Wolff, daughter Hazel, and their dog Lenny.

A Facebook page for the event is available at: https://www.facebook.com/events/140523173385824/


Tommy Pico Reading

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Tommy Pico. The reading will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Tommy “Teebs” Pico is author of the books IRL (Birds, LLC, 2016), Nature Poem (Tin House Books, 2017), and Junk (forthcoming 2018 from Tin House Books). He was a Queer/Art/Mentors inaugural fellow, 2013 Lambda Literary fellow in poetry, a 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Fellow in Poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been profiled in Fusion, Nylon, and the New Yorker. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he now lives in Brooklyn where he co-curates the reading series Poets With Attitude (PWA) with Morgan Parker at the Ace Hotel, co-hosts the podcast Food 4 Thot, and is a contributing editor at Literary Hub. @heyteebs

To give you a sense of his work, you’ll find a brief but descriptive review of Pico’s second collection, Nature Poem, from Publishers Weekly below:

“Pico (IRL) centers his second book-length poem on the trap of conforming to identity stereotypes as he ponders his reluctance to write about nature as a Native American. This is “fodder for the noble savage/ narrative,” he writes as ignorant people ask, “do I feel more connected to nature/ bc I’m NDN.” Other similarly problematic expectations are wryly discussed: “An NDN poem must reference alcoholism, like// I started drinking again after Mike Brown and Sandra Bland and CharlestonI felt so underwater it made no sense to keep dry.” As an extension of this dilemma, Pico poses questions about what is natural human behavior: Is it natural for a football player to assault his girlfriend? Is colonialism natural? What about the feeling one gets while listening to Beyoncé’s “Mine”? Pico’s alter-ego “Teebs” remains in constant motion, leaping from the dentist’s office to drag queen karaoke night to the movie theater: “I’m an adult I only let myself have/ candy at the movies/ so I’ve been going to the movies A LOT.” In making the subliminal overt, Pico reclaims power by calling out microaggressions and drawing attention to himself in the face of oppression, “the way the only thing more obvious than your body/ is leaving yr shirt on in the pool.” (May)

https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-941040-63-8

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Danielle Deulen at dcdeulen@willamette.edu.


Gaetano DeLeonibus, Faculty Colloquium

Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us next Friday, October 27, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester and the second in our Pedagogy/Digital Humanities series.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone Studies
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators